BHI Policies & Procedures

Current BHI students may access all policies, procedures, forms and other resources at https://catalyst.uw.edu/workspace/bhiprgm/48302/

 

General BHI Program Policies 

 

BHI Pre-Approved Course Substitutions

 ITHS TL-1 program courses:

  • A combination of BIOST 517 & 518 (Applied Biostatistics I/II) with EPI 512 & 513 (Epidemiologic Methods I/II) may substitute for BIME 537: Research Methods
  • UCONJ 599 (Selected Readings in Interdisciplinary Clinical Research) may substitute for BIME 590/591 research seminar credits. Up to 4 credits may be substituted.

Research seminars:

With prior approval, up to 4 seminar credits may be substituted with another seminar. The substitution must be related to one’s plan of study and research interests, and approved by the advisor and the Graduate Program Director. The below seminar(s) is pre-approved for substitution:

  • BIME 598 (Special Topics in Biomedical and Health Informatics)

 

Satisfactory Progress Toward Degrees

This policy is provided to all MS and PhD students and faculty in the graduate program in Biomedical and Health Informatics to clarify what should constitute satisfactory progress toward completion of degree. Related statements of Graduate School policies are available to students and faculty at the Graduate School Policies, Procedures, and Requirements website.  No document could capture all the potential circumstances that could lead to unsatisfactory progress; this document provides some general expectations and guidelines for making satisfactory progress.

For students who have been on leave or are pursuing the degree on a part-time basis, satisfactory progress will be determined on an individual basis in consultation with the student’s Academic Advisor/Supervisory Committee Chair and the Graduate Program Director.  A student’s satisfactory progress status will be taken into consideration when granting permission for on-leave status.

General Expectations

Under normal circumstances, a student is considered to be making satisfactory progress if s/he successfully completes the following within an 8-quarter period for an MS and a 5-year period for a PhD (excluding periods on leave):

MS

  • A minimum of 10 credits/quarter (full time status) for at least 5 quarters; 60 credits are required for the MS degree.
  • All course requirements as stipulated by the program with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 and minimum quarterly GPA of 3.0.
  • All core courses must be passed with individual grades of at least 2.7 or they must be retaken.
  • No more than one “incomplete” grade outstanding for one quarter.
  • Thesis proposal approved 4 months prior to date of intended graduation.
  • Successful defense of thesis by the end of the 8th quarter of the program.

PhD

  • A minimum of 10 credits/quarter (full-time status) for at least 7 quarters; 60 credits must be completed prior to the General Exam, and 27 are 800 level Dissertation credits.
  • All course requirements as stipulated by the program with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 and minimum quarterly GPA of 3.0.
  • All core courses must be passed with individual grades of at least 2.7 or they must be retaken.
  • No more than one “incomplete” grade outstanding for one quarter.
  • Qualifying Examination taken and passed by the end of Autumn quarter of the student’s 3rd year in the program.
  • General Examination taken and passed by the end of Autumn quarter of the student’s 4th year in the program.
  • Successful defense of dissertation by the end of Spring quarter of the student’s 5th year in the program. If defense is not completed by the end of Spring quarter of the student’s fifth year in the program then satisfactory progress can be maintained by developing a revised written timeline with milestones approved by the supervising committee and submitted to the Graduate Program Director, including the anticipated graduation date.

Persons Responsible for Evaluation of Student Progress

MS

  • Initially, the student’s Academic Advisor, along with the Graduate Program Advisor and Graduate Program Director, is responsible for monitoring the student’s coursework and research progress through the program.
  • After a Master’s Supervisory Committee is established, the committee chair is both the student’s academic and thesis advisor, and the committee has responsibility for assessment of the thesis.

Ph.D.

  • Initially the student’s Academic Advisor, along with the Graduate Program Advisor and Graduate Program Director, is responsible for monitoring the student’s progress through the program.
  • After a Doctoral Supervisory Committee is established, the committee chair is both the student’s academic and dissertation advisor, and the committee has responsibility for assessment of the general examination and the dissertation.

Criteria for Performance/Progress Evaluation

  • Course grades.
  • Quality of academic efforts (e.g., research assistantship, teaching assistantship, research study, abstracts, presentations, papers); as judged by faculty and/or outside reviewers.
  • Written research agreements and written evaluations of research and academic progress.

Conditions Warranting Recommendation to Alter a Student’s Status

The Graduate Program in Biomedical and Health Informatics is guided by Graduate School Memorandum No. 16: Unsatisfactory Performance and Progress, in considering the actions listed below. Advisors/supervisors are notified of these actions as well as students.

Warn

The Graduate Program Director will issue a warning letter to students for:

  • Cumulative GPA below 3.25.
  • Untimely progress through the program
  • Unsatisfactory quality of academic efforts

If a warn is issued, a written remediation plan with milestones needs to be developed by the student and approved by the student’s advisor and Graduate Program Director.

Probation

The Graduate Program Director will place a student on probation for:

  • Cumulative GPA less than 3.25 for two consecutive quarters
  • Unsatisfactory quality of academic efforts for two consecutive quarters
  • Failure to meet milestones or deliverables outlined in the remediation plan in response to an issued warn
  • Untimely progress for at least one consecutive year

If a probation is issued, a written remediation plan with milestones needs to be developed by the student and approved by the student’s advisor and Graduate Program Director.

 

Obtaining Graduate Non-Matriculated (GNM) Status

Taking coursework as a graduate non-matriculated (GNM) student can be a useful way to make a more informed decision about applying to our graduate program. The department only grants GNM status on occasion and usually under special circumstances, as faculty focus their graduate teaching on the substantial population of matriculating graduate students in the department. In a typical year, there are only one or two GNM students in the department.

Purpose of GNM Status

Graduate Non-matriculated (GNM) status is a classification for post-baccalaureate students who are not seeking a graduate degree at the present time. As such, international students requiring a student (F-1) visa and current holders of F-2 (dependent) or B-1 visitor visas are not eligible for GNM status. While you do not need to have GNM status to register for a graduate-level class, you must have it in order to apply the credits to a graduate degree at the University of Washington should you later be admitted as a graduate student. By contrast, courses taken either as a post-baccalaureate student (those seeking a second bachelor’s degree) or as a non-matriculated student cannot be applied to graduate degree requirements.

The GNM application process is distinct from the regular graduate program application process and GNM status does not influence decisions about admission into the Biomedical and Health Informatics graduate program.

Limitations of GNM Status

A maximum of 12 GNM credits may be applied toward a graduate degree. While a GNM student is permitted to take more than 12 credits, this is the maximum number of credits that may be later applied toward a graduate degree. GNM students are admitted to the Biomedical and Health Informatics Graduate Program for a maximum of three consecutive quarters of study.

Application Deadlines

Autumn quarter entry

Those applying for autumn quarter GNM status must have a complete GNM application in the

department’s possession by May 15.

Winter quarter entry

Those applying for winter quarter GNM status must have a complete GNM application in the

department’s possession by November 15.

Spring quarter entry

Those applying for spring quarter GNM status must have a complete GNM application in the

department’s possession by February 15.

We do not accept GNM applications for summer quarter entry.

NOTE: These are departmental application deadlines and supersede any Graduate School application deadlines.

GNM Applicant Eligibility Requirements

  • Minimum 3.0 or B grade point average (on a 4 point scale) for the last 90 graded quarter credits or 60 graded semester credits
  • Bachelor’s degree

GNM Application Requirements

GNM applications must be submitted through the Graduate School online application website at https://www.grad.washington.edu/applForAdmiss/. The following documents are required as part of the application:

  • Unofficial transcripts from each institution from which you received a degree of Bachelor or higher.
  • Letter of intent (2–3 pages) detailing your educational and career go This letter should make it clear why you have chosen to apply for GNM status in Biomedical and Health Informatics. State your academic goals so that the admissions committee may determine whether your goals could be met in our department and through GNM status.
  • Three letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation from professors are preferred, but if you have been out of school for many years or have another reason for using non-academic references, other professional recommendations are acceptable.
  • Resume or curriculum vitae

Additional Information

 Additional information on GNM status may be found on the Graduate School website:

http://gs1.s.uw.edu/admissions/understanding-the-application-process/graduate-non-matriculated-students/

 

Enrolling as a Non-Matriculated (NM) Student

For a non-matriculated student who has not received Graduate Non-Matriculated (GNM) status in BHI to enroll in a BHI course, instructor and departmental approval are needed. Unlike for students who have been given a GNM status, credits earned as NM are generally not transferable to a graduate degree program. It is rare for an NM student without GNM status to be enrolled in a BHI course in the department.

To enroll in a BHI course as non-matriculated student, an application must be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the quarter when the course is offered.

Application Requirements:

The following application materials should be sent electronically to the Graduate Program Advisor at informat@uw.edu.

  • Unofficial transcripts from each institution from which you received a degree of Bachelor or higher.
  • Letter of intent (1 page) detailing the rationale for enrolling in the BHI course
  • Resume or curriculum vitae.

The material is reviewed by the instructor of the course, the Graduate Program Director and the Department Chair and evaluated based on previous academic performance, fit with the program, and course logistics (e.g., whether the course has already reached full capacity in enrollment). The applicant will be notified prior to the beginning of the quarter about the decision.

Non-Degree Enrollment Procedures:

Once the applicant has been approved to enroll in a BHI course, the student may proceed with the steps outlined at http://www.nondegree.washington.edu/nondegree/ to enroll in the course.

Admissions Deferral

Prospective students admitted to the MS or PhD BHI Program will be allowed to request deferral for only one academic year.  Deferral is defined as postponed entry to the program by one year—the admission is guaranteed for the following year unless unforeseen circumstances lead to a temporary or permanent suspension of an educational offering or a programmatic decision not to admit any new students that year.  If the prospective student does not formally accept admission to enter the program after one year, admission is no longer valid and the prospective student would have to formally re-apply in the future.

Academic Advisor Role

Academic advising is an essential component of graduate students’ educational experience. Academic advisors provide students with information on academic requirements needed for degree completion, help students plan for future graduate study or a career, and assist the student in navigating through campus resources and identifying potential collaborators, and plan for research rotations.

-Together with the Graduate Program Advisor provide information on academic requirements needed for graduation. Advisors assist students in developing an academic and career plan, and in selecting elective course work, monitor students in the program, and discuss how a course of study fits a particular academic or career interest. Advisors answer questions concerning a specific academic concern, such as problems with a particular class.

-Help students plan for future graduate study or career. Advisors discuss how an academic major can prepare a student for his/her career, and what career options are available. They prepare the original Individual Development Plan.

-Serve as a campus resource. Advisors assist students in navigating through campus resources and in introducing students to other faculty and research labs in preparation for a research rotation or to identify a potential PhD/MS Advisor for the student.

The academic advisor originally assigned to a student does NOT have to conduct a research rotation with them. Once the student has identified a Chair for their PhD or MS work, that faculty becomes both the academic and thesis/dissertation advisor for the student.