News and Events

Chair’s Message

pth-use-this-oneSpring has arrived, with hints of summer weather already. We are moving toward our vision with a number of activities. We have completed the Clinical Informatics Fellowship match and have filled our two open positions with two excellent candidates who start July 2018. We are in the midst of interviewing students for our research focused MS and research focused PhD programs who will start in Fall 2018.  Applications are also open for our applied on-line MS in Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies. We are beginning a new overall strategic planning process for all of our Departmental activities in conjunction with preparing for our every 10 year academic program review. We are still actively recruiting new faculty as part of our strategic plan to expand our core faculty by 50%, with 3-4 positions remaining to be filled over the next two years (see link).

Cordially,

Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD
Chair and Professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education

Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education Newsletter

Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education News

May 14-18, 2018

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, May 17, 4:00pm-4:50pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Building C, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

 Title:  Global Health Informatics — Lessons Learned and Opportunities for the Future

Speaker:  Sherrilynne Fuller, PhD

Abstract:  Health informatics challenges in low resource countries are both plentiful as well as urgent.  Health challenges range from emerging infections to maternal-child health issues to chronic disease and diseases of the aging.    As a global health informatics researcher and educator I have had the good fortune to observe and participate in the introduction of health information systems and technologies in countries across the globe — from Southeast Asia to South America to Africa.    Through a series of stories and images I will share the lessons learned and provide a view of opportunities for the future.

Speaker’s Bio:  Sherrilynne Fuller, PhD is Professor Emeritus, Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, School of Medicine and the Information School, at UW.  She received her BA and MLS  degrees from Indiana University and her PhD (Information Science) from the University of Southern California.   Fuller served as the founding head of the Division of Biomedical and Health Informatics, School of Medicine, UW and led several large-scale campus and regional research and development projects in the areas of biomedical and health informatics, telemedicine and information technology.  As Director, UW Health Sciences Libraries for over twenty years she led the development of state of art library and information systems.

Fuller has lectured, consulted and led health information systems research and development and training programs in the US and throughout the world.   Examples of international programs and workshops she has led in recent years include:    Improving Health Outcomes through Interoperability (Ministry of Health leaders and university faculty from throughout the Mekong Basin region countries  and beyond in collaboration with the BIOPHICs Center at Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand);   Health Informatics for HIV/AIDS Data Management Fellowship Program and the Afya Bora senior fellowship program (Kenya, Tanzania, Botswana, Uganda);  and multiple courses, consultancies and curriculum development support at Cayetano-Heredia University, Lima, Peru.   She has served as a member of a UW Global Health Department ITECH team leading projects related to health information systems planning and capacity assessment in health IT and informatics with the Ministry of Health and Social Services, Namibia and also with the Department of Health, South Africa.   She was designated by the Fulbright Scholars Program as a Specialist in Health Informatics (2012-2017)

Fuller served as a member of the President’s (White House) Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) 1997-2002  and co-chaired  the  PITAC Subcommittee on Health.   In addition, she has served as a member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health and is an elected fellow of the Medical Library Association and the American College of Medical Informatics.

BIME 591A– Conversations with Industry

Wednesday, May 16, 1:00-1:50pm, Health Sciences, Room T478

Facilitators: Dave Masuda, MD, MS and Ron Buie

See course website for details.

BIME 598A – Operating Clinical Computing Systems in a Medical Center

Wednesday, May 16, 4:00-4:50pm, SOCC 308

Facilitators: Michael Leu, MD, MS, MHS and Dave Masuda, MD, MS

See course website for details. 

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Fred Wolf Mentorship Award

As you know Fred Wolf passed away this last year after a long and courageous battle. At his memorial service in October, a recurring theme from most everyone who spoke of him was what a wonderful and inspiring mentor he was. As a way to honor Fred and keep his spirit in our midst, the department is announcing the first annual Fred Wolf Mentorship Award.  This award is open to all BIME faculty, staff, postdocs and students to both nominate and receive the award.

Please send an email to Heidi Kelm, heidi5@uw.edu, with a paragraph or two nominating a faculty member, staff member, postdoc or student to receive the award. Please briefly describe how your nominee has mentored you. A review committee will be formed to review the nominations and make the final selection.  Nomination deadline is Friday, May 25th. The award recipient will be announced at our annual end of year celebration in June.

 Drs. Tom Payne and Paul Sutton are giving Grand Rounds in the Department of Medicine on Thursday, 5/17, from 8-9am in T-625 (UWMC), titled:  The EHR in 2018:  Current Status and Future, Locally and National

Dr. Reza Sadeghian, BHI Clinical Informatics Fellow, was elected to COCIT, the AAP’s Council on Clinical Information Technology.

 

UPCOMING GENERAL EXAMS

 Juandalyn Burke
Thursday, May 17, 3pm, UW Medicine SLU, Building E, Room E130B

 Title:  Using Network-Based Modeling to Implement Strategies for Predicting HIV-Drug Resistance

Abstract: Identifying and understanding the factors contributing to antiretroviral drug resistance is essential to controlling the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  Healthcare agencies have identified HIV drug resistance (HIV-DR) as a public health threat to the progress of HIV prevention and achieving a high percentage of viral suppression in the population. Globally, HIV-DR levels are increasing, specifically in areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Some health organizations have addressed these concerns through monitoring specific clinical and quality of care indicators. However, other factors associated with HIV-DR such as the identification of genetic variants of the host and virus prior to the administration of antiretroviral treatment for HIV positive patients has not become widely utilized in the routine monitoring of HIV-DR. Host and viral genetic variation has been associated with drug toxicity, virologic failure, neurocognitive clinical outcomes, and the emergence of drug resistant mutations . In this project, we aim to model the effects of pharmacogenomic information on HIV-DR, within-host and in the population, specifically in areas of sub-Saharan Africa.  We also aim to optimize the effect of antiretroviral treatment (ART) on levels of HIV-DR in the population using a mathematical and epidemic modeling platform called Evonet by creating an ART optimization routine.

Jared Erwin
Friday, June 1, 9am, UW Medicine SLU, Building C, Room C123B

 Title:  Finding genetic association to adverse drug events

Abstract: Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a serious problem causing over 100,000 hospitalizations in the U.S. annually.  Trying to better predict an individual’s response to a particular medication is a major area of research and some success using genetic biomarkers has been achieved.  The eMERGE PGx data set is a collection of clinical records combined with a targeted pharmacogenetic panel of 84 genes.  This research explores possible ADEs within this data set and begins to explore associations between the ADEs and genetic variation.  Potential ADEs are mined from the clinical data using a known database of adverse events.  Those potential ADEs are then used as phenotypes in a case/control genetic association study.  Machine learning methods will also be employed to examine the data across phenotypes and attempt to narrow the list of biomarkers used in the analysis.

UPCOMING MASTER’S DEFENSES

Yiqi Ni

Monday, May 21, 11:00am, UW Medicine- SLU Building C, Room C122

Abstract: In recent years, online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions have played an increasing role in treating late-life depression. Previous studies have reported that online CBT interventions can be effective in treating depression and promoting behavioral changes among older participants, but inadequate engagement will potentially weaken the effectiveness. Most previous investigations of engagement in online CBT have collected data from self-reported symptom scales or questionnaires and used statistical approaches to establish associations between engagement and various predictors like demographics, personality, disease symptoms or intervention design factors. In this study, we considered engagement as an important aspect of user experiences and employed multiple methods on log data and qualitative data to understand engagement of individual user and in group environments. We analyzed data from MoodTech, a pilot study of an online CBT intervention for older adults with depression, characterizing participants’ engagement and exploring motivations and barriers that may cause differences in observed patterns. There were three aims. First, we identified patterns of engagement through visual analysis of log data. Second, we conducted a network analysis of the participants who had access to the social interaction features and compared the three kinds of peer interactions (comments, likes and nudges) as representatives of group engagement. Third, we performed a qualitative analysis of the textual data, including messages, posts, comments and thought records from the participants, to identify the application of CBT principles and explore how participants engaged with the intervention. From the learning and practice experiences of the older participants, we identified several themes that affected the engagement and attitudes toward the intervention. Future intervention designs may take these findings into consideration and adjust lesson contents for different patterns of participants, as well as improve the usability to meet the needs of older adults.Title: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Exploring Engagement in MoodTech: An Online CBT Intervention     for Older Adults with Depression

Aarti Swaminathan
Friday, May 25, 11:00am, UW Medicine- SLU Building E, Room E130B Title:  Understanding Context of Use and Perceptions of Usability of Cosegregation Analysis Tool AnalyzeMyVariantAbstract: Calculating the genetic risk for a disease of allelic variants of unknown significance can be a complicated task. AnalyzeMyVariant is a tool designed for genetics experts that uses pedigree data from families with genetic variants of unknown significance, to calculate likelihood ratios that a variant fits pathogenic or benign patterns. In this study, we performed a two-part evaluation of the tool to understand the context within which genetics experts might use this tool, and assess their initial usability perceptions. First, we surveyed existing literature to develop an instrument to assess perceptions of usability based on constructs of usability, quality, and safety. The instrument consisted of scaled as well as open-ended questions assessing users’ perceptions relating to each of the constructs of interest, with regard to their experience with AnalyzeMyVariant. We used the instrument to collect qualitative and quantitative Likert-type data from 57 genetic experts who were recruited via email invitations. The second part of our evaluation was comprised of follow-up, semi-structured interviews with 6 genetics experts to identify work contexts in which users might use the tool, and further delve into issues faced in using the tool. These interviews were inductively coded and major themes identified using the constant comparative method. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for future improvement of the tool. This work has importance in the consideration of the varying needs of genetics professionals and how they use cosegregation analysis in their work, and the difference between requirements for research-focused and clinically-focused work. The results could also inform the future development of other tools developed for experts, particularly with regard to the attention that must be paid to experts’ context of use, background knowledge, and the intended applicability of results.

 

OTHER EVENTS

 BIME Happy Hour
Thursday, May 17, 5:00 p.m., South Lake Union, Reception Lounge

Please join us for our monthly departmental BYOB Happy Hour, held every third Thursday of the month. As always, please bring your own beverage; snacks will be provided!

 

May 7-11, 2018

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, May 10, 4:00pm-4:50pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Building C, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  Tales of Two Studies: The Children’s Health Cohort and the Electronic Medical Record and Genomics (eMERGE) Network

Speaker:  Ian Stanaway, PhD

Abstract:  Dr. Stanaway will cover two studies that look at populations using DNA analysis. In the Children’s Health Cohort, both adult and children’s oral microbiota was studied. The agricultural pesticide Azinphos-methyl (AZM) can cause neuronal toxicity and death in animals and insects. Dr. Stanaway hypothesized that bacteria in individual’s mouths would also experience toxicity and there may be fewer genera of microbiota in pesticide exposed individuals. He analyzed quantitative detection of blood AZM using mass spectrometer data in association with the buccal oral microbiome 16S DNA sequence composition of ~200 families with farmworkers and non-farmworkers in households from the Yakima Valley, Washington (USA) area. He found that those exposed had either severely reduced abundance and/or were missing genera of normally common bacteria, including Streptococcus. The second project that he will cover is the Electronic Medical Record and Genomics (eMERGE) Network consortium of 12 medical centers. eMERGE aims to combine genomic association and electronic medical record derived phenotypes to elucidate genomic risks for disease and make medical genomics useful to the clinician and patient.  He will cover the Network’s sampling of pooled subjects, genotype data and association of genetic data to medical record derived phenotypes.

Speaker’s Bio: Dr. Stanaway has a scientific, laboratory and computational career with industrial and academic experience beginning in 1994. Currently, he is a Senior Research Scientist in the Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education at the University of Washington (UW). His primary role here is coordinating data, applying various statistical methods and discovery of genetic information associated with electronic medical record phenotypes with Dr. David Crosslin. This work is for the NHGRI’s electronic Medical Records & Genomics (eMERGE) Network. This resource is aimed to discover and estimate genomic risk interactions with personalized genetic data in an effort to develop robust clinical decision support.

Dr. Stanaway recently earned his Ph.D. of Environmental Toxicology from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (2012-2016). His dissertation research focused on the interactions between the pesticide, azinphos-methyl, and off-target associated antibiotic effects on the oral microbiome of exposed farmworkers. He also investigated the gene by environment interactions of the azinphos-methyl pesticide with the primary blood biomarkers of toxicity, acetylcholinesterase and butylcholinesterase gene enzyme activities. His relevant experience prior to graduate studies includes nearly eight years (2005-2012) in the Department of Genome Sciences (GS) at the UW as a Computational Biologist. Experience in GS involved the discovery, interpretation and analysis of nucleic acid sequence variation using first Sanger and later Next Generation Illumina sequencing and genotyping methods.  Additionally, he has worked extensively with genotype array data, RNA expression analysis and various applied statistical methodologies to developed efficient computational data management and analysis strategies. The rare and common nucleic acid variation data produced has resulted in statistical associations to complex disease phenotypes such as autism, congenital diseases, liver RNA expression and warfarin drug dosing. Other previous relevant experience includes three years (2001-2003) at the pharmaceutical screening company Cerep Inc. developing laboratory and informatics methods designed to improve and inform the drug development process, identify toxicity and off target effects and investigate potential drug re-positioning. Dr. Stanaway plans to continue his academic research in applications benefiting the computational integration of genomic, environmental, pharmaceutical, toxicology, clinical decision, medical record, bio-specimen and phenotype information. Much of this is aimed at elucidating the contributing factors to complex disease and adverse events in susceptible individuals of the population. Beyond analysis and discovery, Dr. Stanaway has a personal interest in science adoption by our culture. Well-founded science will not matter unless it drives public policy and people use it. The implementation of any scientific result or product in functional use must be oriented in the contexts of pragmatism, safety and risk communication for societal trust and adoption to occur.

BIME 591A– Conversations with Industry

Wednesday, May 9, 1:00-1:50pm, Health Sciences, Room T478

Facilitators: Dave Masuda, MD, MS and Ron Buie

See course website for details.

BIME 598A – Operating Clinical Computing Systems in a Medical Center

Wednesday, May 9, 4:00-4:50pm, SOCC 308

Facilitators: Michael Leu, MD, MS, MHS and Dave Masuda, MD, MS

See course website for details.

UPCOMING GENERAL EXAM

Juandalyn Burke
Thursday, May 17, 3pm, UW Medicine SLU, Building E, Room E130B

Title:  Using Network-Based Modeling to Implement Strategies for Predicting HIV-Drug Resistance

Abstract: Identifying and understanding the factors contributing to antiretroviral drug resistance is essential to controlling the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  Healthcare agencies have identified HIV drug resistance (HIV-DR) as a public health threat to the progress of HIV prevention and achieving a high percentage of viral suppression in the population. Globally, HIV-DR levels are increasing, specifically in areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Some health organizations have addressed these concerns through monitoring specific clinical and quality of care indicators. However, other factors associated with HIV-DR such as the identification of genetic variants of the host and virus prior to the administration of antiretroviral treatment for HIV positive patients has not become widely utilized in the routine monitoring of HIV-DR. Host and viral genetic variation has been associated with drug toxicity, virologic failure, neurocognitive clinical outcomes, and the emergence of drug resistant mutations . In this project, we aim to model the effects of pharmacogenomic information on HIV-DR, within-host and in the population, specifically in areas of sub-Saharan Africa.  We also aim to optimize the effect of antiretroviral treatment (ART) on levels of HIV-DR in the population using a mathematical and epidemic modeling platform called Evonet by creating an ART optimization routine.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Fred Wolf Mentorship Award

As you know Fred Wolf passed away this last year after a long and courageous battle. At his memorial service in October, a recurring theme from most everyone who spoke of him was what a wonderful and inspiring mentor he was. As a way to honor Fred and keep his spirit in our midst, the department is announcing the first annual Fred Wolf Mentorship Award.  This award is open to all BIME faculty, staff, postdocs and students to both nominate and receive the award.

Please send an email to Heidi Kelm, heidi5@uw.edu, with a paragraph or two nominating a faculty member, staff member, postdoc or student to receive the award. Please briefly describe how your nominee has mentored you. A review committee will be formed to review the nominations and make the final selection.

Nomination deadline is Friday, May 25th.   The award recipient will be announced at our annual end of year celebration in June.

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Dr. Elaine Nsoesie wrote an article with colleagues at Data & Society on Internet Data and Precision Medicine:  https://points.datasociety.net/proceed-with-caution-852d64faaed5

Dr. Annie Chen gave a talk this week at the School of Information, University of Texas at Austin entitled, “Encouraging patient voice and participation in health- and information behaviors research.”

Carol Rockhill (PI) and BIME Faculty Annie Chen (Co-I) were awarded a pilot research grant through the UW Population Health Initiative for their proposed project, “Using Digital Learning Tools to Enhance Emotion Regulation for Youth Hospitalized for Aggressive Crises,” a three-part pilot study to adapt a technology-based set of personalizable Social Emotional Learning Tools to inpatient psychiatry.

Dr. Andrew Simms will be presenting “Quality​ ​in​ ​Action,​ ​Adapting​ ​Quality​ ​Measures​ ​for​ ​Realtime​ ​Guidance” at the AMIA Clinical Informatics Conference in Scottsdale next week.  Here is a snippet from the abstract submitted to the conference:  As validated, measurable data elements that are collected during patient care, quality measures are used throughout the medical continuum to improve outcomes, prevent injuries, reduce costs, and optimize reimbursement. However, emphasis has traditionally been placed on collection, aggregation, and retrospective reporting. This is valuable since it provides organizations with feedback about how they have performed in the past, but to directly impact and improve compliance this feedback loop must be closed.

Our approach closes this loop. Using a standards based clinical decision support application, CORA, we can determine eligibility for a set of quality measures, and then provide guidance to perform corrective actions during the intraoperative period. The ability to provide near-realtime quality measure status can substantially impact compliance, reimbursement and patient care.

Dr. Anne Turner announced that a publication for the AHRQ funded SOARing project has just been published in JAMIA. Details below.

Title: Monitoring for change: the role of family and friends in helping older adults manage personal health information.

Authors: Jean O. Taylor, Andrea L. Hartzler, Katie P. Osterhage, George Demiris, Anne M. Turner

Journal of the American  Medical Informatics Association.

Published: 02 May 2018

Abstract: https://academic.oup.com/jamia/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/jamia/ocy037/4991817?redirectedFrom=fulltext

 

April 30-May 4, 2018

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, May 3, 4:00pm-4:50pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Building C, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  Pushing the Bounds of Healthcare Interoperability: Lessons, Limitations and Needs

Speaker:  Scott P. Narus, PhD, MS

Abstract:  One of the expected outcomes of electronic health records (EHRs) was an increase in health and healthcare quality through access to electronic data and knowledge across existing technological and organizational boundaries. However, even with the growth in EHR adoptions, widespread access to and use of data in the healthcare environment has remained a significant challenge. Recent advances in interoperability have opened opportunities to both break into previously closed/proprietary EHRs, and increase the ability of third-parties to develop and deliver high-value solutions to improve health and healthcare. Open interoperability standards such as HL7 Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) for data access, Substitutable Medical Apps Reusable Technologies (SMART) for application integration, and CDS Hooks for decision support integration are helping to forge new approaches and interventions from a wider information and technology community. Intermountain Healthcare’s experience in this interoperability environment will be reviewed, including working with a commercial EMR vendor and developing the supporting technology, resource and governance infrastructure. While there is promise in these new approaches, limitations and necessary functionality for a truly interoperable future will be discussed.

Speaker’s Bio: Dr. Narus is a Medical Informatics Director for Intermountain Healthcare, where he works on data, application and knowledge interoperability initiatives. He also has been responsible for clinical information systems infrastructure, including clinical decision support, knowledge management infrastructure, clinical terminology and modeling, and enterprise service architecture. In addition to his responsibilities at Intermountain, Dr. Narus leads the development of the Developers Platform for the Health Services Platform Consortium, which today focuses on open, standards-based infrastructure to support interoperability. Before re-joining Intermountain in 2012, Dr. Narus was an Associate Professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics, School of Medicine, and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of Utah, and he retains those appointments. While at the University he served as the director of informatics infrastructure development for the Biomedical Informatics Core of the University’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), overseeing the technical staff and managing several projects.  Dr. Narus received his Ph.D. in Medical Informatics from the University of Utah in 1995.  After receiving his doctorate, he was hired as a Senior Medical Informaticist at Intermountain Health Care where he was responsible for directing the development of enterprise electronic medical record systems.  He also served as the company’s chief software architect.  He has published over 45 articles in the informatics field and has presented at national and regional conferences on his research. He has served in advisory capacities for the Utah Department of Health (UT-NEDSS), Utah Health Information Network (cHIE), and Veteran’s Health Administration (VINCI).

BIME 591A– Conversations with Industry

Wednesday, May 2, 1:00-1:50pm, Health Sciences, Room T478

Facilitators: Dave Masuda, MD, MS and Ron Buie

See course website for details.

BIME 598A – Operating Clinical Computing Systems in a Medical Center

Wednesday, May 2, 4:00-4:50pm, SOCC 308

Facilitators: Michael Leu, MD, MS, MHS and Dave Masuda, MD, MS

See course website for details. 

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Congratulations to Dae Lee!

On April 23, Dae successfully completed his General Exam titled, “Predictive Approaches for Acute Adverse Events in Electronic Health Records.”   His supervisory committee is chaired by Dr. Meliha Yetisgen and includes Drs. Eric Horvitz, Lucy Vanderwende, and Karol Bomsztyk.

The May Bike Everywhere Challenge coming up (Starting May 1st) and I’ve created a team for BHI. Please considering joining and take advantage of this beautiful weather while riding around the city and your neighborhood. It’s now easier than ever to participate too with the new Spin, Lime Bike, and Ofo bike shares in the city.

Please visit the team page to sign up and for additional information. Hope to see you out on the road!

 

April 16-20, 2018

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, April 26, 4:00pm-4:50pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Building C, Room C123A&B

This talk will not be recorded/livestreamed.

 Title:  Telemedicine to Assist Nurse Practitioners with Managing Acute Change in Condition and Palliative Care

Speaker:  Reza Sadeghian, MD, MBA, MSc

Abstract:  Our objective was to determine the feasibility of using telemedicine to assist certified nurse practitioners (CRNPs) in managing acute change in condition and palliative care assessments in NH residents.  We built and pilot tested a telemedicine system in a single, 80-bed non-profit NH. A telemedicine cart was designed with specific diagnostic medical equipment to perform assessments via telemedicine for NH residents with an acute change in condition. Two CRNPs and 18 RNs performed 60 telemedicine consultations.  A web-based survey was used to assess the CRNP and RN perceptions of the utility of telemedicine services before and after each consult. For 88.3% of the consultations, CRNPs perceived that the technology was effective in the medical management of the resident. For 91.7% of the consultations, CRNPs perceived that the use of telemedicine was an appropriate and effective use of their skillsets and time. CRNPs perceived that the telemedicine consult allowed them to avoid a face-to-face visit by a CRNP 86.7% of the time, and an attending physician 90% of the time. Telemedicine used by CRNPs to conduct telemedicine consultations for an acute change in condition and/or palliative care need in the NH was perceived to be effective in the medical management of residents and has the potential to avoid the need for face-to-face visits.

 Bio: Dr. Sadeghian is a practicing Pediatrician and currently completing his second fellowship in Clinical Informatics at the University of Washington. He completed medical school at Saint George’s University, then an Executive Masters in Business Administration from Auburn University, followed by an NLM post-doctoral fellowship/M.S. at the University of Pittsburgh’s Dept. of Biomedical Informatics. He has extensive experience as a healthcare consultant, including having served as a Director of IT Services, having led ICD-10 conversion efforts, and assisted in various system designs and implementations. His current line of work and research interests include telemedicine, mobile applications including secure text messaging, and EHR optimization. He is interested in improving healthcare value, quality and safety; as well as increasing access to care in underserved areas.

BIME 591A– Conversations with Industry

Wednesday, April 25, 1:00-1:50pm, Health Sciences, Room T478

Facilitators: Dave Masuda, MD, MS and Ron Buie

See course website for details.

BIME 598A – Operating Clinical Computing Systems in a Medical Center

Wednesday, April 25, 4:00-4:50pm, SOCC 308

Facilitators: Michael Leu, MD, MS, MHS and Dave Masuda, MD, MS

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

BIME Faculty Janice Sabin was interviewed by Crosscut regarding the Starbucks racial bias incident: https://crosscut.com/2018/04/starbucks-mandates-racial-bias-training-answer

Postdoctoral fellowship opportunity:

UAB- HudsonAlpha Genomic Medicine Training Program
The purpose of this training grant is to recruit postdoctoral trainees from various disciplines and provide mentorship and clinical research training in genomic medicine.
Sponsor- National Human Genome Research Institute
Contact- Dr. Shaila Handattu

  • Postdoctoral trainees will receive a monthly stipend, tuition and fees assistance, health insurance and travel funds (at NIH-defined level).
  • Deadline for application- April 30, 2018

 

UPCOMING GENERAL EXAM

 Dae Lee
Monday, April 23, 2pm, UW Medicine SLU, Building C, Room C123A&B

 Title: Predictive Approaches for Acute Adverse Events in Electronic Health Records

Abstract:  Since the late 1990s, medical error has been widely discussed as a significant societal burden, and it was the third leading cause of patient death in 2013. Although harm caused by medical professionals’ actions during clinical interventions has been addressed relatively well, patient harm caused by missing the required actions has been reported to be twice as high as the harm resulting from adverse reactions from clinical interventions. The patient harm caused by preventable complications is termed Failure-to-Rescue (FTR) and proposed as a patient safety indicator in hospitals.

The nationwide implementation of the electronic health record (EHR) in the United States has resulted in clinical data being accumulated at an unprecedented scale, enabling researchers to conduct large-scale, longitudinal clinical data analyses; also, many machine learning approaches have been applied to predict a patient’s risk for various adverse clinical outcomes, such as in-hospital mortality, discharge diagnoses, and the onset of clinically adverse events. Although these models could be utilized as a clinical decision support tool in clinical practice, there are several challenges that occur when building data-driven models for clinically adverse events, including estimation of target event time-of-onset and the interpretability of the models.

The goal of the doctoral dissertation is to illustrate the value of predictive modeling in clinical practice, here focusing on adverse clinical events that develop acutely. The present dissertation will also present case studies that show how predictions can be used for identifying FTR cases. If successful, the proposed system could expedite the implementation of predictive models in clinical practice that identify the common patterns appearing in cases where the existing clinical workflow cannot help, coming up with policy measures to deal with these cases in practice.

 

April 16-20, 2018

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – NO CLASS on April 19th, 2018.

BIME 591A– Conversations with Industry

Wednesday, April 18, 1:00-1:50pm, Health Sciences, Room T478

Facilitators: Dave Masuda, MD, MS and Ron Buie

See course website for details.

BIME 598A – Operating Clinical Computing Systems in a Medical Center

Wednesday, April 18, 4:00-4:50pm, SOCC 308

Facilitators: Michael Leu, MD, MS, MHS and Dave Masuda, MD, MS

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

 Congratulations to Dr. David Crosslin!

David Crosslin, PhD, has been promoted to BIME associate professor and adjunct associate professor in the Department of Genome Sciences.