News and Events

Chair’s Message

pth-use-this-oneSpring has arrived, and the cherry blossoms are in bloom on the University of Washington campus. We have completed the application and interview process for our Clinical Informatics fellowship and new fellows will start in July 2017. Prospective PhD students visited in March. We are also ramping up our annual admissions for our on-line applied MS in Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies with applications due May 1st. Finally we are in the midst of an annual faculty recruitment cycle as part of our strategic plan to expand by 50% our core faculty, with 7 positions remaining to be filled over the next two years (see link).

We are happy to share that the University of Washington has maintained its No. 11 position in US News Best Global Universities ranking, and is ranked third among public institutions.  Read more here:  http://www.washington.edu/news/2016/10/25/uw-maintains-no-11-position-in-us-news-best-global-universities-ranking-third-among-public-institutions/

Cordially,

Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD
Chair and Professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education

 

BIME Event Calendar

For a calendar listing of upcoming events, click here.

trail-reduced

Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education News

April 24-28, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

Science in Medicine Lecture Series –Distinguished Lectures

 Thursday, April 27, 12-1pm, Hogness Auditorium (HSB A-420)

Title:  Inherited Breast and Ovarian Cancer: From Gene Discovery to Precision Medicine and Public   Health

 Speaker:  Mary-Claire King, PhD

Professor, Department of Medicine (Medical Genetics), Department of Genome Sciences

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, April 27, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

 Title:  Exploring Personal Health Information Management of Older Adults: The SOARING Study

 Speaker:  Anne M. Turner, MD, MLIS, MPH, FACMI

Associate Professor, Departments of Health Services and Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington

Abstract:  Older adults are the largest consumers of health care and require the greatest portion of health care costs.  How older adults manage their health has profound consequences for health delivery systems, health care expenditure, and public health.  Faced with changes in functioning, chronic diseases and transitions in living situation, older adults require organized access to their health information to make significant health-related decisions.  Personal health information management (PHIM) systems for older adults exist, but few older adults use them.  Limitations include poor health literacy, poor computer skills, and physical or cognitive disabilities.  The goal of the SOARING Study is to improve the design of PHIM systems for older adults through advancing our understanding of the PHIM needs, practices and preferences of older adults and their stakeholders.  Using an integrative sociotechnical approach, our team has conducted a series of qualitative interviews, focus groups, surveys to gain a deeper understanding of older adult personal health information management needs and context. These research findings will be used to inform the design of health information systems that better support older adults.

Speaker’s Bio:  Anne M. Turner, MD, MLIS, MPH is an Associate Professor in the University of Washington’s (UW) School of Public Health with a joint appointment in the Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education in the School of Medicine.  Dr. Turner’s background includes clinical medicine, informatics and public health.  Her informatics training includes a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Sciences (2001) and completion of a National Library of Medicine (NLM) Fellowship in Medical Informatics (2004).  For the past 10 years her research has focused on improving public health practice through information technology.  She teaches the BIME 533 Public Health and Informatics core course and the HSERV 592 MCH Leadership seminar. Dr. Turner will discuss the SOARING project, a 5 year AHRQ funded R01 that focuses on better understanding the health information management needs and practices of adults 60 years and older.  This is a mixed methods research initiative that employs participatory research techniques to identify key design requirements for building health information systems that are user centered and better meet the needs of older adults. Dr. Turner is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics.

See the course website for details.

BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, April 26, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

See course website for details.

UPCOMING GENERAL EXAM

 Nick Robison
Friday, April 28, 10am, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Building E, E130A 

Title: The Problem of Time: Addressing challenges in spatio-temporal data management

Abstract: Across scientific disciples, an ever-growing proportion of data can be effectively described in spatial terms. As researchers have become comfortable with techniques for dealing with spatial data, the next progression is to not only model the data itself, but also the complexities of the dynamic environment it represents. This has led to the rise of spatio-temporal modeling and the development of robust statistical methods for effectively modeling and understanding interactions between complex and dynamic systems. Unfortunately, many of these techniques are an extension to existing spatial analysis methods and struggle to account for the data complexity introduced by the added temporal dimension; this has limited many researchers to developing statistical and visual models that assume either a static state of the world, or one modeled by a set of specific temporal snapshots.

This challenge is especially acute in the world of public health where researchers attempting to visualize historical, spatial data, often find themselves forced to ignore shifting geographic features because both the tooling and the existing data sources are insufficient. Consider, as an example, a model of vaccine coverage for the administrative regions of Sudan over the past 30 years. In 2011 what was originally Sudan is suddenly cut in half as South Sudan emerges as an independent nation. This has an immediate impact on both the visual accuracy as well as the quantitative usefulness of any data generated from aggregate spatial statistics. Or, consider epidemiological case reports that are issued from local medical facilities, how does one account for the fact that their locations may change, or that new facilities may spring up or close down as time progresses. These are real-world problems that existing GIS platforms struggle to account for.

While spatio-temporal data modeling is a complex topic with few simple solutions, there are some immediately valuable projects that stand to directly benefit working public health researchers in both analyzing and presenting time-varying spatial data. This project aims to improve upon this area of study by developing a unified system for storing, integrating, and querying complex geospatial data, specifically focused on international administrative boundaries. The goal of this system is to provide a simple interface to allow users to perform a specific set of query operations over an historically integrated set of global administrative boundaries and return logically valid data based on specific spatial and temporal constraints. This system will be applicable to a number of GIS applications, specifically applications attempting to visualize historical public health indicators such as vaccination rates, or develop complex spatio-temporal models, such as malaria risk maps.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Peter Myler, PhD, Affiliate Professor with BIME and Professor & Director of Core Services, Center for Infectious Disease Research, was awarded the BBVA Foundations Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Development Cooperation category.  The award recognizes his decades of work on genome sequencing of the parasites causing leishmaniasis and Chagas disease.  Read the full article on the award here.

David Heckerman, MD, PhD, Affiliate Professor with BIME, has joined Human Longevity, Inc., a genomics-powered health intelligence company, as its Chief Data Scientist. He will lead an advanced analytics team at their Mountain View, CA office to tackle the analysis of large-scale medical and genomic data.

Dr. Heckerman is a 25-year veteran of Microsoft, where he led their first team to focus on machine learning. For the last several years he led the Microsoft Genomics team, advancing research in genomics and computational biology and supporting Microsoft cloud services for genomics.

For more information, see the press release: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/machine-learning-visionary-david-heckerman-joins-human-longevity-inc-as-chief-data-scientist-300427014.html

Congratulations to Juandalyn Burke!

Juandalyn Burke, BHI PhD student, has been selected to the TL1 Translational Research Training Program with the Institute of Translational Health Sciences for the 2017-18 year! She will be part of a 20-person pre-doctoral trainee cohort featuring students from each UW Health Sciences school the College of Engineering.

 

April 17-21, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, April 20, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Building E, Room E130A&B (Updated location only for 4/20/17!)

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  Home-based Technologies to Support Aging and Patient Engagement

Speaker:  George Demiris PhD, FACMI

Alumni Endowed Professor in Nursing, School of Nursing & Professor and Vice Chair for Informatics Education, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, School of Medicine
Director, Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies, University of Washington

Abstract:  Advances in wearable and mobile technologies have led to the pervasiveness of informatics tools that facilitate both active and passive monitoring of patients at home and in communities. We present projects examining the role of monitoring technologies in community and residential settings to support older adults aiming to maintain their independence and quality of life. These projects utilize diverse technologies such as telehealth kiosks, smart home sensors and wearable devices. We highlight examples that demonstrate the potential of these tools to facilitate patient engagement and provide increased access to patients and families and meet their own information needs. We discuss the challenges and opportunities in implementing and evaluating such monitoring systems as well as in visualizing complex data generated by these solutions in a way that is accessible and meaningful to various stakeholders.

Speaker’s Bio:  George Demiris is the Alumni Endowed Professor in Nursing at the School of Nursing and Professor and Vice Chair for Informatics Education in the Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education in the School of Medicine at the University of Washington. He is the Director of the Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies Program, the NLM Biomedical and Health Informatics Training Program and the NINR Informatics and Aging Training Program. He also serves as Director of the Informatics Core of the Center for Innovation in Sleep Self-Management at the University of Washington. His research interests include the design and evaluation of home based technologies for older adults and patients with chronic conditions and disabilities, smart homes and ambient assisted living applications and the use of telehealth in home care and hospice. He is a Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and a Member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences.

 See the course website for details.

BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, April 19, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Dr. Annie Chen will give a national webinar presentation to the AMIA Consumer & Pervasive Health Informatics Workshop on Monday, April 17th. Please see below for details and log in information:

Please join us on Monday April 17th 1-2 pm CST, 2-3pm EST (GMT 5pm) for a presentation by Dr. Annie Chen from the University of Washington discussing the article:

The Relationship Between Health Management and Information Behavior Over Time: A Study of the Illness Journeys of People Living With Fibromyalgia”, JMIR

Join WebEx Meeting

Meeting number:

747 505 553

Join by phone
+1 210 606 9466 US Toll
+1 866 282 7366 US Toll Free
Access code: 747 505 553


PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

  1. Divita, G. Luo, L.T. Tran, T.E. Workman, A.V. Gundlapalli, M. H. Samore. General Symptom Extraction from VA Electronic Medical Notes. Proc. 2017 World Congress on Medical and Health Informatics (MedInfo’17), Hangzhou, China, Aug. 2017.

BHI Postdoc Lisa Jean Taylor-Swanson, PhD, MAcOM, EAMP will present the following this month:

Western Institute of Nursing, April 19–22, 2017, Denver, CO

50 Years of Leadership: Continuing the Vision

Two talks in a symposium: From Measurement to Model: Self-Awareness and Hot Flash Severity and Dynamics of Stress and Fatigue during the Menopausal Transition, Early Postmenopause

Facilitating a focus group of nurse practitioners regarding women’s health, Western Consortium on Women’s Health
Society for Acupuncture Research, April 27-29, 2017, San Francisco, CA
Advancing the Precision Medicine Initiative through Acupuncture Research
Co-sponsored by the Department of Anesthesia at Stanford University

Three posters:

Systematic Review of Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: Efficacy and Clinically-Meaningful Change, Lisa Jean Taylor-Swanson, Jennifer A Stone, Megan K Gale, Amanda Gaitaud, Christopher Huson, Fujio MacPherson, Jessica Martens, Jacob Godwin, Mercy Yule

Treating Complex Veteran Illness with Acupuncture in the Community, Lisa Conboy ScD, Lisa Taylor-Swanson PhD, MAcOM, EAMP, Kaiyin Hsu MAOM, LicAc., Joe Chang LicAc, Iris Bell MD PhD, Marc Goldstein MD, Rosa N Schnyer, DAOM, L.Ac

Whole Systems of Traditional East Asian Medicine: A Multiple Case Study, Lisa Taylor-Swanson, PhD, MAcOM, EAMP 

OTHER EVENTS

 BIME Happy Hour
Thursday, April 20, 5:00 p.m., South Lake Union, Reception Lounge

Please join us for our monthly departmental BYOB Happy Hour, held every third Thursday of the month. As always, please bring your own beverage; snacks will be provided!

Congratulations to new mother Taryn Hall!

BHI Postdoc Taryn Hall and her husband welcomed a new baby boy, Benjamin, on April 8, 2017 at 9:49am.

 

April 10-14, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, April 13, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  Why is healthcare failing to protect patient’s data? 

Speaker:  Cris V. Ewell, PhD

Chief Information Security Officer, UW Medicine; Affiliate Assistant Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education

Abstract:  Healthcare organizations depend on networks and systems to provide information to their employees, partners, and patients. Compromises that affect the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of this information are significant events and can cause economic and reputational damage to the organization. The exploitation of security vulnerabilities by external, partner, or internal individuals is inevitable. These threat actors are highly motivated, organized, and often well-funded, which gives them an advantage over current information security controls and strategies. The struggle to protect the information and systems continues despite significant investment in information security controls and is partly due to inadequate organizational strategies which include current risk management practices. Traditional information security strategies and standards have diminished effectiveness, are disproportionately technical and do not adequately address the rapidly evolving and dynamic threat landscape.

The discussion will identify key threat actors, current threats, and new practices that will help to reduce the risk to health care organizations. One of the key concepts we will examine is the assumption of breach (AOB) – a belief that we can no longer adequately protect the networks and information assets from the persistent threat actors. By using practices like AOB, information security professionals can manage programs that can increase the maturity of the organization and decrease the overall risk. The strategy should be to implement reasonable and appropriate controls and allocate resources to areas that will mitigate the business risk to an acceptable level without impeding the business functions and ensure that the organization does not implement controls that have little effect against identified threats.

Speaker’s Bio:  Cris V. Ewell is the Chief Information Security Officer at UW Medicine. As the senior leader in the Information Security program, he has full strategic and operational oversight for building and managing the security framework, teams, programs, and policies to decrease exposure, drive awareness, and minimize risk for the organization. Along with UW Medicine, he has worked with several other organizations, including Seattle Children’s Hospital, to help them implement risk management practices to address information security risks and to promote meaningful dialogue about the information security program with executive management and board members. Cris has a PhD in Computer Information Systems – Concentration in Information Security, MSc in Information Technology – Concentration in Information Security, and BSc in Information Technology – Concentration in Network Technology. Cris also received the North America Healthcare executive award and has been recognized as one of the top 10 influencers in health information security.

 See the course website for details.

Global Infectious Disease Seminar 2016-2017, Center for Infectious Disease Research

Monday April 10, 12:00pm, Center for Infectious Disease Research, Discovery Conference Room

As part of the Global Health Seminar Series, the Center for Infectious Disease Research is pleased to announce a seminar by Peter Myler, Ph.D., Professor and Director of Core Services at Center for Infectious Disease Research and Director of Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID).

Title: “How does modified DNA base J terminate transcription in Leishmania?

BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, April 12, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

See course website for details.

 

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Congratulations to Tina Straycalf!

Congratulations to Tina Straycalf for completing 35 years of service at UW. She is a Program Coordinator in the Division of Medical Education and Evaluation.

Tina was originally hired by Frank Evans to assist in the course evaluation process for the School of Medicine in April of 1983.  She was provided a desk, a typewriter and reams of paper, both carbon and typing.  Though the technologies have changed, and the number of support staff have diminished, Tina has retained her core position for providing faculty feedback on their teaching efforts in the Foundations phase of medical school (previously MS-1 and MS-2).

In that time, Tina has been with the Office of Research in Medical Education, the Division of Research in Medical Education, the Department of Medical Education and the Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education.  To put that in perspective for the entire department, here are a few notables of 1983:  1) ARPANET came to be, 2) Apple released LISA, 3) Microsoft released the beta version of Word, 4) the Dow Jones stood at $1284.00, 5) the last episode of MASH was aired, 6) a new Ford Mustang cost $6572 and 7) Sally Ride become the first woman to fly as an astronaut.  And, Tina joined an office without any ethnic/racial diversity.  Suffice it to say that Tina’s commitment to Medical Education and the School of Medicine has been continuous and most appreciated.  Thank you for your service!

Congratulations to Susan Yantis!

Congratulations and thanks to Susan Yantis for 10 years of continuous service at UW. Susan is a Program Coordinator working in the Medical Education and Evaluation Division of our department. She has been a major support in the increased program evaluation and assessment activities of the department. Providing transcription support, completing content analyses of questionnaires, handling data entry and initial collation of large annual questionnaires, and setting up all the meetings and appointments needed to get this work done. In the midst of all this activity, she has learned and applied new skills, and never lost her happy spirit and approach to work.

UW Medical Informatics was tied for 3rd in the world in the Center for World University Rankings!

BIME Core Faculty, BHI Extended Faculty, BHI Students and BHI Alumni:

I was delighted to see that UW Medical Informatics was tied for 3rd in the world in the Center for World University Rankings. Congratulations and thanks to all the BIME faculty, staff and students for all you have done to make this possible.

Of note UW was ranked #9 internationally overall with 22 subjects at UW in the top 5

More information overall is at the Seattle Times page below

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/education/dozens-of-university-of-washington-programs-make-top-10-in-new-global-ranking/

We are in excellent company. Here is the screenshot from  http://cwur.org/2017/subjects.php#Medical%20Informatics

Again congratulations!

-Peter

BHI faculty Gang Luo is invited to attend Microsoft Research Faculty Summit 2017: The Edge of AI that will happen on July 17-18.

Congratulations to Graham Kim!

On March 31, Graham Kim successfully passed his General Exam for his proposal entitled “Secondary Usage of EHR Data for Patient-Specific Modeling and Big Data Analysis.”  Congratulations Graham!

Ross Lordon, PhD student, was selected to present at Stanford’s Medicine X conference this September. The title of his talk is Patient-centered mobile health application implementations as a team sport: a patient and provider working together to achieve the full potential of health information technology.

 

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Revere D, Hills R, Dixon B, Gibson J, Grannis S. Notifiable condition reporting practices: implications for public health agency participation in a health information exchange. BMC Public Health 2017;17(1):247. [PMID:28284190]

April 3-7, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

The Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies Core of the UW Center for Innovation in Sleep Self-Management presents:

—————————————————————————————————————————–

iCardia: An Innovative mHealth platform for remote monitoring of physical activity, exercise, and sleep measures using Fitbit technology and smartphones

Spyros Kitsiou PhD

Tuesday, April 4

2:00 – 3 P.m.

Magnuson Health Sciences Center T-612

Dr. Spyros Kitsiou is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical and Health Information Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research is in the areas of telehealth/home telemonitoring, mobile health informatics, health technology assessment, and research synthesis methods with a focus on systematic reviews and meta-analyses of eHealth and mHealth interventions. His mHealth Innovation Lab studies the application, use, and effectiveness of mHealth interventions, including the use of wearable sensor devices and mobile apps for self-management of cardiovascular disease and other chronic conditions.

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, April 6, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  Systems approaches to understanding Leishmania differentiation

 Speaker:  Peter Myler, PhD

Professor & Director of Core Services, Center for Infectious Disease Research, formerly Seattle BioMed

Director of Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID)

Affiliate Professor, Departments of Global Health and Biomedical Informatics & Medical Education, University of Washington

Abstract:  Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania cycle between promastigotes in the sand fly mid-gut and amastigotes in the phagolysosome of mammalian macrophages. In collaboration with Dr. Dan Zilberstein at the Technion – Israel Institute of Science, we have used high coverage transcriptomic and proteomic approaches to interrogate the changes in gene expression that occur during promastigote-to-amastigote differentiation of Leishmania donovani.  These experiments showed have shown that differentiation is well-regulated, with ordered and coordinated changes in mRNA and protein abundance resulting in the parasites re-tooling their metabolic pathways for life in the new host environment. Phosphoproteomic analyses also revealed substantial changes in protein phosphorylation within minutes of exposure to the differentiation signal. This systems approach has now enabled us to begin dissecting some the signaling pathways responsible for initiation of the differentiation process.

Speaker’s Bio:

Peter J Myler is Professor and Director of Core Services at the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington in the Departments of Global Health and Biomedical Informatics & Medical Education, as well as a member of the Molecular and Cellular Biology program.  After earning a PhD in Biochemistry in 1982 from the University of Queensland while studying malaria proteins at Queensland Institute of Medical Research, he carried out post-doctoral research on antigenic variation in African trypanosomes at the Issaquah Health Research Institute (the predecessor to Seattle Biomed and CID Research) and Washington State University. In 1985, he returned to Seattle Biomed and in 1993 was appointed Assistant Professor in Pathobiology at the University of Washington. For the last 20 years, Peter had been at the forefront of applying genomic technologies (genome sequencing, expression profiling and proteomics) to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of gene expression in Leishmania parasites.  About 15 years ago, he became actively involved in structural genomics, and is currently Director and PI of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID), which is funded under a contract from NIAID.  SSGCID has used X-ray crystallography and NMR to solve ~1000 protein structures from bacterial, viral and eukaryotic pathogens, as well as providing >3500 purified proteins to the scientific community to facilitate structure-based drug development, vaccine development and other basic research.  Dr. Myler was recently awarded the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award, in the Development Cooperation category, for his work on the genome sequencing of Leishmania and Trypanosoma.

See the course website for details

BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, April 5, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

Here is an updated seminar description:

This one credit seminar will explore “precision medicine” and how it differs from the traditional medical practice. We will then explore the role of informatics in precision medicine. Along the way we will explore how clinicians think, how treatment decision-making happens in the real world, and what precision medicine means for the future of healthcare.  See course website for details, and subscribe to the course announcements mailing list here.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES 

Congratulations to Hyunggu Jung!

BHI PhD student Hyunggu Jung has been selected to serve as an Assistant Editor for MedInfo 2017.

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Abdulwahhab O. Alshammari, Neil F. Abernethy (Presented). “Variability Among Public Health Systems Informs Data Standards for Electronic Case Reporting”. Full Paper presentation at the International Conference of Informatics, Health & Technology (ICIHT’17) 2017, Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia.PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Abdulwahhab O. Alshammari, Hyunggu Jung (Presented). “Designing Community of Practice Systems: A Value Sensitive Approach”. Full Paper presentation at the International Conference of Informatics, Health & Technology (ICIHT’17) 2017, Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia.

BHI PhD Students Ryan James and Ahmad Aljadaan are co-authors on an abstract titled, “Three-Dimensional Kidney Model Development for Virtual Reality,” that has been accepted to the upcoming Engineering & Urology Society Annual Meeting.

 OTHER EVENTS

 Husky Help & Hope (H3) Walk 2017: May 20, 2017, 11am-3pm, UW Campus Sylvan Grove Theater

Hosted by Huskies for Suicide Prevention and Awareness (HSPA), the Husky Help & Hope Walk 2017 is a two-mile cross-campus walk for suicide prevention and awareness.  To register, go here. To donate, please go here.

 

March 27-31, 2017

SPRING QUARTER BHI COLLOQUIA (MARCH 27 – JUNE 2)

BIME 590A (SLN 11081) – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursdays, 4:00-4:50 p.m., UW Medicine South Lake Union, Building C, Room C123A&B

Facilitator: Adam Wilcox, PhD

Informatics faculty and researchers from the UW and affiliated institutions present their research findings and discuss their views of national developments in their areas of expertise. See the course website for details.

NOTE: There will be no BIME 590 seminar on Thursday, March 30.

 

BIME 591 (SLN 11085), Spring 2017 – Precision Medicine & Informatics

Wednesdays, 1-1:50pm, SOCC 308

Instructor: Wayne Liang, MD

Faculty Sponsor: David Crosslin, PhD

This one credit seminar will explore “precision medicine” and how it differs from the traditional medical practice. We will then explore the role of informatics in precision medicine. Along the way we will explore how clinicians think, how treatment decision-making happens in the real world, and what precision medicine means for the future of healthcare.  If interested, please fill out pre-course survey. See course website for details.

Note: Currently registration has reached maximum enrollment but is in the process of being expanded. If you are having trouble registering, please wait 24 hours and try again, or contact Lora Brewsaugh (lorab2@uw.edu) for assistance.

 

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

*NO CLASS* on Thursday, March 30, 4:00-4:50 p.m.

UPCOMING GENERAL EXAM

Karam (Graham) Kim
Friday, March 31, 1pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Building C, C123A&B

Title: Secondary Usage of EHR Data for Patient-Specific Modeling and Big Data Analysis

Abstract: The increasing volume of electronic health record (EHR) data presents a great opportunity for research use. The value of secondary usage of EHR data has been recognized for over a decade, with uses including quality assurance, public health surveillance, and clinical research. Here, I explore their use with biosimulation models. Biosimulation models are mathematical representations of biological systems, and they can help with mechanistic understanding of physiology, predict the dynamics of a biological system, and be made patient-specific. Using clinical data with biosimulation models has the potential to benefit both the biosimulation modelers, as well as clinicians. The abundance of retrospective clinical data available for research is a promising alternative to the traditional method of validating models by conducting resource-intensive prospective studies. These models can then be made patient-specific to simulate the physiology of individuals. When used in the clinical setting, these patient-specific models have the potential to be used by clinicians to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of the patient. When used with a patient cohort, the data from the EHR combined with information derived from the patient-specific models may be analyzed to find correlations with clinical phenotypes that could have broader impact in biomedicine. Through my dissertation research, I propose to provide an informatics pipeline for annotating clinical datasets, and demonstrate using those datasets to validate and optimize models without needing to conduct burdening prospective studies. Furthermore, I will explore novel application of big data analysis to EHR data in conjunction with biosimulation models. In this proposal, I describe my approach as applied to cardiology and nephrology. In addition, I describe my preliminary work annotating hemodynamics and blood electrolytes data, and optimizing a cardiovascular biosimulation model using the hemodynamics data.

 

March 20-24, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME faculty Janice A. Sabin, PhD, MSW will speak at the upcoming Race, Health and Justice: Benjamin Rabinowitz Symposium in Medical Ethics, held on March 31st.

This cross-disciplinary symposium brings together students, faculty, researchers and members of the public to discuss racial disparities in population health and health care, and the broader social, political, economic and historical structures in which they occur.

When: March 31, 2017 | 8:30 AM- 5:00 PM
Where: HUB room 340, University of Washington
Cost: Free. Please RSVP as space is limited.

View the preliminary program.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Congratulations to Shefali Haldar!

On March 13, Shefali Haldar successfully passed her General Exam for her proposal entitled “Assessing Needs and Design Recommendations of a Peer Support Tool for Hospital Safety.”  Congratulations Shefali!

Congratulations to Shawn Banta!

Assistant to the Chair Shawn Banta was named “Rookie of the Year” at the UW Combined Fund Drive appreciation event on Wednesday night.

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Meliha Yetisgen and Lucy Vanderwende. Automatic Identification of Substance Abuse from Social History in Clinical Text. To Appear in Proceedings of 16th Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Medicine, Vienna, Austria, 2017.

BHI Student Maher Khelifi’s paper has been selected as finalist for AMIA TBI Student Paper Competition

S06: TBI Student Paper Competition

  • Interrogating Patient-level Genomics and Mouse Phenomics towards Understanding Cytokines in Colorectal Cancer Metastasis
    Cai, Y. Chen, C. Zheng, R. Xu, Case Western Reserve University
  • Design Recommendations for Pharmacogenomics Clinical Decision Support Systems
    Khelifi, P. Tarczy-Hornoch, B. Devine, W. Pratt, University of Washington
  • Integrative Network and Transcriptomics-based Approach Predicts Genotype-specific Drug Combinations for Melanoma
    Regan, The Ohio State University; P. Payne, Washington University; F. Li, The Ohio State University
  • Precision Diagnosis of Melanoma and Other Skin Lesions from Digital Images Using Deep Learning
    Bhattacharya, University of California, San Francisco/University of California, Santa Barbara; A. Young, A. Wong, D. Hadley, M. Wei, University of California, San Francisco

OTHER EVENTS

Congratulations to Nick Robison!

BHI PhD Student Nick Robison and Callie Delling were married on Saturday, March 11, 2017.  Best wishes to the happy couple!