News and Events

Chair’s Message

pth-use-this-oneSpring has arrived, and the cherry blossoms are in bloom on the University of Washington campus. We have completed the application and interview process for our Clinical Informatics fellowship and new fellows will start in July 2017. Prospective PhD students visited in March. We are also ramping up our annual admissions for our on-line applied MS in Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies with applications due May 1st. Finally we are in the midst of an annual faculty recruitment cycle as part of our strategic plan to expand by 50% our core faculty, with 7 positions remaining to be filled over the next two years (see link).

We are happy to share that the University of Washington has maintained its No. 11 position in US News Best Global Universities ranking, and is ranked third among public institutions.  Read more here:  http://www.washington.edu/news/2016/10/25/uw-maintains-no-11-position-in-us-news-best-global-universities-ranking-third-among-public-institutions/

Cordially,

Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD
Chair and Professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education

 

BIME Event Calendar

For a calendar listing of upcoming events, click here.

trail-reduced

Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education News

Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education News

May 29-June 2, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS 

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, June 1, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

 Title:  Designing Co-therapy Tools for Peers

 Speaker: Katie O’Leary, PhDc, Information School, University of Washington

Abstract:  More than 18% of American adults manage mood disorders that interfere with their work, family, and social relationships. These individuals must engage in complex work to manage their moods on a daily basis, including taking medications, tracking indicators, self-administering cognitive interventions, and using emotional regulation skills. This complex self-care is burdensome, and difficult to perform under the influence of extreme mental states. Moreover, individuals are commonly faced with performing these tasks in isolation due to the stigma of mental illnesses and the barriers (e.g. cost and transportation) to accessing support. Although research has investigated behavioral intervention technologies for delivering mental health care at scale, such as online tutorials, mood tracking, crowdsourcing, and chat-based hotlines, little is known about how online tools can facilitate peers to build core psychotherapy skills together. I introduce my dissertation work exploring this design space of co-therapy tools for peers, including designs by peers envisioning futuristic technologies, and data from a field study of a new co-therapy tool, called Chatback, that empowers peers to use evidence-based skills in supportive chats.

Speaker’s Bio:  Katie is a fifth-year Information School PhD student at the University of Washington, working across the disciplines of informatics, design, and psychology. She has worked at the Group Health Research Institute, and Google as a UX Research Intern. Her research in industry and academia has informed the design of health reminders, clinician-patient collaboration, peer-to-peer psychotherapy, online privacy, and multi-device experiences. Her dissertation work focuses on designing mobile and web tools for new social practices that promote mental health. Jacob O. Wobbrock, Wanda Pratt, Kristen Lindgren, and Stephen Schueller advise this work.

http://students.washington.edu/kathlo/index.html

 

BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, May 31, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES 

New Faculty Announcement: We are delighted to announce the Andrea Hartzler will be joining the core BIME faculty on 9/1/2017. Her research focus is on the human-centered design of collaborative technologies that empower people to help one another lead healthy and productive lives. She will be coming to us after 3 years working as a scientific investigator at Group Health Research Institute (now Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute) working with multidisciplinary teams and care delivery on  patient-centered research and services spanning genome-guided decision support to patient-generated data. 

Dr. Lynne Robins invites BIME faculty to attend CLIME’s Annual Symposium:

CLIME Together: A Symposium for Excellence in Health Professions Education
Who: UW Health Professions Educators
When: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 | 9:00am – 1:00pm | Hors D’oeuvres reception from 1:00 – 2:00pm
Where: Talaris Conference Center (4000 NE 41st Street, Seattle, WA 98105)
Why: Come meet other members of UW’s vibrant community of educators and participate in a half-day of activities devoted to sharing educational innovations and scholarship. Let’s celebrate our education community and its accomplishments together!
RSVPhttps://2017climetogether.eventbrite.com
There is no cost to attend.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
We are delighted that Dr. Leslie H. Fall, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth University and MedU, will kick-off our morning with an invited plenary.

  • 8:30 – 9:00am: Registration
  • 9:00 – 10:00am: Welcome & Invited Plenary, “Collaborating to improve the integration of basic science into health professions education and practice ” by Leslie H. Fall, MD, Giesel School of Medicine, MedU
  • 10:00 – 10:10am: Break
  • 10:10 – 11:20am: Lightning Round Abstract Presentations
  • 11:20 – 11:30am: Break
  • 11:30am – 12:45pm: Hackathon Round Table Discussions: A team-based creative exercise for new innovations
  • 12:45 – 1:00pm: Awards and Acknowledgements
  • 1:00 – 2:00pm: Hors D’oeuvres Reception

 

1R01MD011532-01 funded May 2017: Janice Sabin has received funding from the NIMHD in the role of Co-Investigator to assist in implementation of the COmmuNity-engaged SimULation Training (CONSULT) for Cultural Competence project. CONSULT is a training intervention being developed by UMass Medical School that features community-members from racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disadvantaged populations as high-fidelity standardized patients (actors trained to portray patients in simulations). The goal of CONSULT is to train early-stage clinicians in the setting of a safety-net health system that serves a disproportionate share of populations of color and low socioeconomic status to develop awareness and communication skills that can overcome sociocultural differences between patients and providers, and the effects of these differences on communication and clinical outcomes. The primary outcome is change in blood pressure recorded in the electronic medical record of racial and ethnic minority patients and Medicaid recipients (regardless of race) with hypertension. Dr. Sabin will serve as lead contact with Project Implicit (a virtual research laboratory), guide analysis for bias assessment and bias awareness, contribute to interpretation of analysis, findings and manuscript writing.  PI: Jennifer Tjia, MD, UMass Medical School, Co-Investigator: Janice A. Sabin, PhD

 

Janice Sabin was invited as faculty lead and panelist for a session on implicit bias at the Western Society of Pediatric Cardiology Annual Meeting (WSOPC),  May 19, 2017, Title: Implicit Bias in the Clinical Environment, Seattle, WA.

Janice Sabin has been invited to present at the  AAMC meeting in November in Boston. Title: Strategies for Responding to Explicit and Implicit Bias. She will discuss development and evaluation of the UWSOM search committee training program, Implicit Bias in the Clinical and Learning Environment course, and a course on Bias Toward Adolescents.

 Dr. George Demiris and PhD student Yong Choi were featured on a Q13 Fox News Story! Check out the story here!

UPCOMING MASTER’S DEFENSES
Shuyang Wu
Wednesday, May 24, 9am, Health Sciences Building, Room HSE212
Title: A Bayesian Network Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Incorporating Gene Expression Profiles
Abstract: Radiation therapy is a treatment for metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma, which allows precision targeting of certain groups of lymph nodes. A Bayesian network predictive model was developed aiming to help achieve such precision using information on the primary site and size of the tumor, representing the current decision-making process in clinical settings. The patient’s genetic profile was added to examine its predictability of metastasis through the improvement in prediction accuracies. The model was trained with publicly available data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and validated against the TCGA dataset as well as clinical data reported to the University of Washington Tumor Board. Results show that genetic profile data improves model accuracy and such improvement may affect clinical decision making especially for patients with more advanced metastasis. A prototype for decision support application was built based on the results to demonstrate the clinical significance of the model. However, more data is needed to show significance of the proposed effects, as well as to improve the accuracy of the overall model.

 

 

Jin Qu
Wednesday, May 31, 1:30pm, SLU Building C, Room C123A
Title: Predicting Cancer Outcome with Multispectral Tumor Tissue Images
Abstract: Tumor tissue slides have been used by clinicians to assess cancer patient’s condition and indicate prognosis. Several studies have suggested that the distribution of important immunological biomarkers on tumor tissue slides might help predict survival outcome [1] [2] [3]. These studies rely upon non-parametric Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with Log-rank test to extract statistical insights, which, however, has several disadvantages such as prediction ambiguity and inability to directly model continuous variables.

 

In this study, we engineered 676 features encoding cellular distribution information from multi-spectral tumor tissue images from 118 HPV-negative oral squamous cell cancer patients. We leveraged statistical methods and predictive models to explore the predictive power of these features. 18 features were identified as potential survival predictors through Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Our best model, random forest model, has achieved 58.54% prediction accuracy rate on independent validation dataset. Although the model does not suggest strong predictive power of selected features, evaluation on large scale training data is still needed to further tune model parameters and generate more concrete results.

 

Tressa Hood
Wednesday, May 31, 3:30pm, Health Sciences Building, T474
Title: A Systems Biology Approach to Characterizing Gene Fusion Pathways in Cancer
Abstract: Gene fusions have long been known to drive cancer. Initial discovery of gene fusions was opportunistic, and functional assessment was done individually and experimentally. There is no clear systems biology approach to understanding the impact of gene fusions on the signaling networks within tumor cells. An integrative computational approach was taken to achieve a better understanding of gene fusions and their complex influence on pathways and interaction networks. Using well-studied fusions and publicly available gene expression data, the effect of fusion events on the expression pattern of gene networks revealed unique differences in fused tumors, non-fused tumors and normal samples. This approach identifies gene expression signatures associated with specific fusions, and provides a model for integrating experimental and pathway data to better understand the biology of a fusion genes and their roles in oncogenesis.

 

 

 

 

Xiyao Yang
Friday, June 2, 11am, SLU Building C, Room C123B
Title: Leaf2Tableau: From Real-Time Clinical Data to Clinical Knowledge Discovery
Abstract: Leaf-to-Tableau, a self-service and real-time clinical data visualization pipeline, is designed and developed to handle data visualization requests for queries developed in Leaf, a clinical data explorer developed by University of Washington Medicine Information Technology Services. It can extract and visualize any Leaf datasets into a portable format that researchers can easily explore without needing a highly technical or statistical background, providing a quick visual summary of the target population. This completes a CDW self-service model with a researcher constructing a query to identify a specific patient cohort in Leaf and subsequently developing custom visualizations for exploration or publication, as well as receiving in return data files for analysis.

 

Dongyang Chen
Monday, June 5, 10am, Health Sciences Building, T359
Title: Qualitative Assessment of Hot Debriefs for Code Teams at Seattle Children’s Hospital
Abstract: Seattle Children’s Hospital recently implemented ‘hot debriefs’ for code teams that respond to cardiac or respiratory resuscitation code events. Hot debriefs are meetings immediately after the code event where the code team members are able to discuss the details of the event that just transpired. These discussions generally revolve around aspects of the code event that went well as well as those that could be improved upon. Before the implementation of these hot debriefs, no such formal meetings with the entire code team were required. This meant that if any particular code team member did want to discuss a code event, participation was minimal and the meeting would often occur at a much later time such as the following day. Hot debriefs were implemented with the intent of increasing information review and improving the quality of future code events. I assessed the status of these hot debriefs using well-established qualitative research methods and semi-structured interviews with clinicians who participated in them to understand their thoughts and feelings on the new process. I interviewed ten participants (including nurses, respiratory therapists, physicians, etc.) and qualitatively analyzed their responses. Four key themes emerged: the effectiveness of hot debriefs, process formalization, openness of communication, and dissemination of information. For the first theme, the participants unanimously approved of the hot debriefs as a process for increasing information review and improving the quality of code events. However, there were concerns revolving around the other three themes with mixed opinions. This study shows that in order to effectively implement a process such as hot debriefing, one should consider the needs and opinions of the participants themselves.


May 22-26, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, May 25, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  Exploring Personal Health Information Management of Older Adults: The SOARING Study

Speaker: Anne M. Turner, MD, MLIS, MPH, FACMI

Abstract:  Older adults are the largest consumers of health care and require the greatest portion of health care costs.  How older adults manage their health has profound consequences for health delivery systems, health care expenditure, and public health.  Faced with changes in functioning, chronic diseases and transitions in living situation, older adults require organized access to their health information to make significant health-related decisions.  Personal health information management (PHIM) systems for older adults exist, but few older adults use them.  Limitations include poor health literacy, poor computer skills, and physical or cognitive disabilities.  The goal of the SOARING Study is to improve the design of PHIM systems for older adults through advancing our understanding of the PHIM needs, practices and preferences of older adults and their stakeholders.  Using an integrative sociotechnical approach, our team has conducted a series of qualitative interviews, focus groups, surveys to gain a deeper understanding of older adult personal health information management needs and context. These research findings will be used to inform the design of health information systems that better support older adults.

Speaker’s Bio: Anne M. Turner, MD, MLIS, MPH is an Associate Professor in the University of Washington’s  (UW) School of Public Health with a joint appointment in the Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education in the School of Medicine.  Dr. Turner’s background includes clinical medicine, informatics and public health.  Her informatics training includes a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Sciences (2001) and completion of a National Library of Medicine (NLM) Fellowship in Medical Informatics (2004).  For the past 10 years her research has focused on improving public health practice through information technology.  She teaches the BIME 533 Public Health and Informatics core course and the HSERV 592 MCH Leadership seminar. Dr. Turner will discuss the SOARING project, a 5 year AHRQ funded R01 that focuses on better understanding the health information management needs and practices of adults 60 years and older.  This is a mixed methods research initiative that employs participatory research techniques to identify key design requirements for building health information systems that are user centered and better meet the needs of older adults. Dr. Turner is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics.

BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, May 25, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Beth Devine, PhD, PharmD, MBA, Adjunct BIME Faculty, wrote the commentary for an eGEMS special issue that features 8 selected manuscripts presented at the Concordium meeting in September 2016.  One of the included papers includes collaboration with BHI graduate Dr. Andrea Hartzler.  The special issue, along with Dr. Devine’s commentary, can be found here. 

BIME faculty Dr. Janice Sabin was an invited guest representing CEDI at the UWSOM A &P committee document revision meeting on May 3rd to describe and discuss how work on diversity, equity and inclusion can be valued in the A & P process. Our BIME A & P document was used as a model for revisions under consideration for the School A & P doc.

Congratulations to BHI PhD student Ryan James!  The company run by Ryan, Pear Med, was recently on GeekWire: https://www.geekwire.com/2017/seattle-childrens-hospital-test-new-vr-medical-technology-change-lives-patients/

UPCOMING MASTER’S DEFENSES
Shuyang Wu
Wednesday, May 24, 9am, Health Sciences Building, Room HSE212
Title: A Bayesian Network Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Incorporating Gene Expression Profiles
Abstract: Radiation therapy is a treatment for metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma, which allows precision targeting of certain groups of lymph nodes. A Bayesian network predictive model was developed aiming to help achieve such precision using information on the primary site and size of the tumor, representing the current decision-making process in clinical settings. The patient’s genetic profile was added to examine its predictability of metastasis through the improvement in prediction accuracies. The model was trained with publicly available data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and validated against the TCGA dataset as well as clinical data reported to the University of Washington Tumor Board. Results show that genetic profile data improves model accuracy and such improvement may affect clinical decision making especially for patients with more advanced metastasis. A prototype for decision support application was built based on the results to demonstrate the clinical significance of the model. However, more data is needed to show significance of the proposed effects, as well as to improve the accuracy of the overall model.

 


May 15-19, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

 Seminar:  Monday, May 15, 3:00 p.m., HSB, H-679, followed by Meet and Greet from 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Speaker: Dr. Maggie Ramirez

Postdoctoral Fellow at UCLA

Title:  Leveraging Technology to Improve Health Care & Health of Latinos with Chronic Illnesses

Abstract:  Magaly Ramirez, PhD, is a postdoctoral scholar in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management. Dr. Ramirez earned her Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from the University of Southern California in 2016. Her research focuses on the design and evaluation of health information technology to support patient self-management and the delivery of patient care, especially for low-income racial/ethnic minorities with chronic diseases. Dr. Ramirez’s past research involved evaluating the design of an automated telephonic assessment system that periodically called patients to assess depression symptoms, monitor treatment adherence, prompt self-management behaviors, and inquire about patients’ needs for provider contact. In addition, her previous research involved eliciting patient preferences for a text messaging intervention to promote physical activity and pilot testing the intervention to assess feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness. Finally, Dr. Ramirez helped to design, develop, and implement a mobile health technology for team-based stroke prevention care management. She subsequently conducted an evaluation to investigate provider perceptions of the mHealth technology’s usefulness and challenges. Her recent project includes assessing the impact of an electronic alert on provider prescribing behavior and on patient health outcomes. Dr. Ramirez grew up in the Lower Yakima Valley and earned her B.S. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from the University of Washington. Her training has been supported by a pre-doctoral fellowship from the National Science Foundation, a Diversity Supplement from the National Institutes of Health, and a T-32 training grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, May 18, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  TBD 

Speaker: Pat Areán, PhD

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington

Abstract:  TBD

Speaker’s Bio: Patricia Areán is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington, and the director for Innovations in Behavioral Interventions Research at UW.  Dr. Areán is an international expert on effectiveness of behavioral interventions for mood disorders in special populations such as older adults and ethnic minorities.

See the course website for details.

 BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, May 17, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

See course website for details.

 

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

 

Kalet AM, Phillips MH, Doctor JN, Gennari JH.  Developing Bayesian networks from a dependency-layered ontology: a proof-of-concept in radiation oncology. Medical Physics (in press)

UPCOMING MASTER’S DEFENSES
Shuyang Wu
Wednesday, May 24, 9am, Health Sciences Building, Room HSE212
Title: A Bayesian Network Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Incorporating Gene Expression Profiles
Abstract: Radiation therapy is a treatment for metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma, which allows precision targeting of certain groups of lymph nodes. A Bayesian network predictive model was developed aiming to help achieve such precision using information on the primary site and size of the tumor, representing the current decision-making process in clinical settings. The patient’s genetic profile was added to examine its predictability of metastasis through the improvement in prediction accuracies. The model was trained with publicly available data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and validated against the TCGA dataset as well as clinical data reported to the University of Washington Tumor Board. Results show that genetic profile data improves model accuracy and such improvement may affect clinical decision making especially for patients with more advanced metastasis. A prototype for decision support application was built based on the results to demonstrate the clinical significance of the model. However, more data is needed to show significance of the proposed effects, as well as to improve the accuracy of the overall model.

 

 

Jin Qu
Wednesday, May 31, 1:30pm, SLU Building C, Room C123A
Title: Predicting Cancer Outcome with Multispectral Tumor Tissue Images
Abstract: Tumor tissue slides have been used by clinicians to assess cancer patient’s condition and indicate prognosis. Several studies have suggested that the distribution of important immunological biomarkers on tumor tissue slides might help predict survival outcome [1] [2] [3]. These studies rely upon non-parametric Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with Log-rank test to extract statistical insights, which, however, has several disadvantages such as prediction ambiguity and inability to directly model continuous variables.

 

In this study, we engineered 676 features encoding cellular distribution information from multi-spectral tumor tissue images from 118 HPV-negative oral squamous cell cancer patients. We leveraged statistical methods and predictive models to explore the predictive power of these features. 18 features were identified as potential survival predictors through Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Our best model, random forest model, has achieved 58.54% prediction accuracy rate on independent validation dataset. Although the model does not suggest strong predictive power of selected features, evaluation on large scale training data is still needed to further tune model parameters and generate more concrete results.

 

 

Xiyao Yang
Friday, June 2, 11am, SLU Building C, Room C123B
Title: Leaf2Tableau: From Real-Time Clinical Data to Clinical Knowledge Discovery
Abstract: Leaf-to-Tableau, a self-service and real-time clinical data visualization pipeline, is designed and developed to handle data visualization requests for queries developed in Leaf, a clinical data explorer developed by University of Washington Medicine Information Technology Services. It can extract and visualize any Leaf datasets into a portable format that researchers can easily explore without needing a highly technical or statistical background, providing a quick visual summary of the target population. This completes a CDW self-service model with a researcher constructing a query to identify a specific patient cohort in Leaf and subsequently developing custom visualizations for exploration or publication, as well as receiving in return data files for analysis.

 

May 8-12, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, May 11, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  Intelligent Personal Health Record

 Speaker: Gang Luo, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington

Abstract:  Web-based personal health records (PHRs) are under massive deployment. To improve PHR’s capability and usability and provide users with personalized healthcare information to facilitate their daily activities of living, we proposed the concept of intelligent PHR (iPHR). iPHR introduces and extends expert system technology, Web search technology, database trigger technology, and natural language generation technology into the PHR domain. By extensively using medical knowledge and nursing knowledge, iPHR can anticipate users’ needs, guide users to provide the most important information about their medical condition, and automatically form medical queries. Our iPHR system currently provides four functions: questionnaire-guided search for disease information, recommendation of home nursing activities, recommendation of home medical products, and continuous user monitoring. Upon the detection of an abnormal event that may have potential medical impact, the fourth function follows the push model of information distribution and actively pushes related personalized healthcare information to the user. This talk will present both the high-level design and some implementation details of iPHR.

Speaker’s Bio:  Gang Luo obtained his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science minor in Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2004. Between 2004 and 2012, he was a Research Staff Member at the IBM T.J. Watson research center. Between 2012 and 2016, he was a faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah. Gang is currently a faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education of the School of Medicine at the University of Washington. His research interests include health/clinical informatics (software system design/development and data analytics), big data, information retrieval, database systems, and machine learning with a focus on health applications. He invented the first method for automatically providing rule-based explanation for any machine learning model’s prediction/classification results without degrading accuracy, the questionnaire-guided intelligent medical search engine iMed, intelligent personal health record, and SQL and compiler progress indicators.

 See the course website for details.

 BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, May 10, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Congratulations to Nick Robison!

On April 28, Nick Robison successfully passed his General Exam for his proposal entitled, “The Problem of Time: Addressing challenges in spatio-temporal data management.” Congratulations, Nick!

BHI PhD student Lucy Wang has been selected to serve on the 2017-2018 JAMIA Student Editorial Board. Congratulations, Lucy!

UW’s home page features the research of BHI Faculty George Demiris and PhD students Yong Choi and Laura Kneale! 

Be sure to check out the article and video on “Creating Safer, Smarter Homes” highlighting the work by Dr. Demiris, Yong Choi, Laura Kneale and other collaborators.

 

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

 A. O. Alshammari and H. Jung, “Designing community of practice systems: a value sensitive approach,” 2017 International Conference on Informatics, Health & Technology (ICIHT), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2017, pp. 1-7.

doi: 10.1109/ICIHT.2017.7899005
URL: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=7899005&isnumber=7898999

A. O. Alshammari and N. F. Abernethy, “Variability among public health systems informs data standards for electronic case reporting,” 2017 International Conference on Informatics, Health & Technology (ICIHT), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2017, pp. 1-8.

doi: 10.1109/ICIHT.2017.7899010
URL: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=7899010&isnumber=7898999

Postdoctoral student Claire Han will present the paper, “Interventions using social media for cancer prevention and control,” at the Oncology Nursing Society Conference in Denver, Colorado, on May 5.

Claire-Jungyoun Han, PhD, MSN, RN, University of Washington, Dept. of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, George Demiris, PhD, FACMI, University of Washington, Dept. of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, School of Medicine & Dept. of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Informatics, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA and Young-Ji Lee, PHD, MS, RN, University of Pittsburgh, Dept. of Health and Community Systems, School of Nursing & Dept. of Biomedical Informatics, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA

 

May 1-5, 2017

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, May 4, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title:  Adventures in Clinical Informatics: A fellow’s story

Speaker:  Xinran (Leo) Liu, MD

Clinical Informatics Fellow, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington

Abstract:  This talk will be an overview of some of the work that a clinical informatics fellow does, including: Machine learning, dashboard design, secure messaging, pathway development, orderset management, etc.

Speaker’s Bio:  Xinran (Leo) Liu is currently a clinical informatics fellow at the University of Washington.  He finished his residency in internal medicine at UW. Prior to residency, he studied chemistry at Cornell University and completed his medical degree at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. During medical school, Liu was co-founder and editor-in-chief of UndergroundMed, a student community focused on creating videos to teach clinical topics from the student’s point of view. He was selected as the 2013 Rolf C. Syvertsen Fellow, an award presented to an exceptional single fourth year medical student at Dartmouth who, among many qualities, shared their knowledge of medicine. During residency, he was involved in using multimedia for patient education of gastroesophageal reflux disease; and was working with Thomas Payne, Medical Director of UW Medicine IT Services and associate professor of medicine (general internal medicine), on examining the feasibility of using speech recognition to facilitate timely entry of admission notes.  As a clinical informatics fellow, he has been involved in a variety of projects, including: sepsis and cost prediction using machine learning, evaluating secure messaging vendors for the hospital system, designing physician dashboards, creating pathways, managing and revising ordersets, etc.

See the course website for details.


BIME 591D – Precision Medicine and Informatics

Wednesday, May 3, 1:00–1:50 p.m., SOCC 308

Facilitator: Wayne Liang, MD

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES


Mandi Hall
, PhD, BIME Affiliate Assistant Professor, recently accepted a new job offer at Microsoft, Sr. User Researcher, Health Team, Patient Engagement (AI and Research).  Congratulations to Dr. Hall!