News and Events

SNOW

Photo Credit: BIME Student Hyunggu Jung

Chair’s Message

pth-use-this-oneWe are approaching the end of winter with longer days and crocuses beginning to bloom, but there has been some unusual snow this year with more in the forecast. We have completed the application and interview process for our Clinical Informatics fellowship and new fellows will start in July, 2017. Prospective PhD students will be visiting in March. We are also ramping up our annual admissions for our on-line applied MS in Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies with applications due May 1st. Finally we are in the midst of an annual faculty recruitment cycle as part of our strategic plan to expand by 50% our core faculty, with 7 positions remaining to be filled over the next two years (see link).

We are happy to share that the University of Washington has maintained its No. 11 position in US News Best Global Universities ranking, and is ranked third among public institutions.  Read more here:  http://www.washington.edu/news/2016/10/25/uw-maintains-no-11-position-in-us-news-best-global-universities-ranking-third-among-public-institutions/

Cordially,

Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD
Chair and Professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education

 

BIME Event Calendar

For a calendar listing of upcoming events, click here.

trail-reduced

February 27-March 3Weekly News

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME Faculty Candidate – Marzyeh Ghassemi, PhD Candidate

Monday, February 27, 10:00 a.m., South Lake Union, Orin Smith Auditorium (livestream available via tcs.slu.washington.edu; video will be labeled as “BIME Faculty Candidate” with a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Speaker: Marzyeh Ghassemi, PhD Candidate

MIT Computer Science Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Title:  Representation learning for health with multi-modal clinical data

Abstract:  The explosion of clinical data provides an exciting new opportunity to use machine learning to discover new and impactful clinical information. Among the questions that can be addressed are establishing the value of treatments and interventions in heterogeneous patient populations, creating risk stratification for clinical endpoints, and investigating the benefit of specific practices or behaviors. However, there are many challenges to overcome. First, clinical data are noisy, sparse, and irregularly sampled. Second, many clinical endpoints (e.g., the time of disease onset) are ambiguous, resulting in ill-defined prediction targets.
In this talk, I will discuss the need for practical, evidence-based medicine, and the challenges of creating multi-modal representations for prediction targets varying both spatially and temporally. I will present recent work that addresses the learning good representations across clinical applications that deal with missing and noisy data. I will discuss work using the electronic medical records for over 30,000 intensive care patients from the MIMIC-III dataset to predict both mortality and clinical interventions, as well as work from a non-clinical setting that uses non-invasive wearable data to detect harmful voice patterns, and the presence of pathological physiology. To our knowledge, classification results on these task are better than those of previous work. Moreover, the learned representations hold intuitive meaning – as topics inferred from narrative notes, and as latent autoregressive states over vital signs. The learned representations capture higher-level structure and dependencies between multi-modal time series data and multiple time-varying targets.

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, March 2, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

 Title:  TBD

 Speaker:  Roxana Chen, PhD, MPH

Social Research Scientist, Public Health, Seattle and King County

Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Health Services,

University of Washington

Abstract:  TBD

Speaker’s Bio:

 Roxana Chen, MPH, PhD, is Affiliate Assistant Professor of Health Services at the University of Washington. Her research interests include chronic disease disparities; health equity; social determinants of health; community-based participatory research; mixed methods to evaluate community and population-level interventions.

 See the course website for details.

 

BIME 591B–Adventures in R- A Practical Coding Seminar

Tuesday, February 28, 1:00pm-1:50pm, HST T663

Facilitator: Carolyn Paisie, PhD

See course website for details.

BIME 591D–Biological Pathway Analysis: Trends and Applications

Wednesday, March 1, 11:00-11:50am, SOCC 350

Facilitators: Lucy Wang and John Gennari, PhD

See course website for details.    

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Congratulations to Sean Mikles!

PhD student Sean Mikles was accepted into the Doctoral Colloquium at the 2017 CSCW conference (https://cscw.acm.org/2017/submit/dc.php). He will also be presenting the following at CSCW:

Mikles SP.  No Wrong Door: Designing Systems to Foster Collaboration in Support of Child Development.  Doctoral Colloquium poster at the 20th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing 2017; Portland, OR

Mikles SP, Suh H, Kientz JA.  The Relevance of Theories and Models of Collaboration to Child Development Support Activities.  Poster presentation at the 20th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing 2017; Portland, OR

UPCOMING GENERAL EXAM

Lucy Lu Wang
Monday, February 27, 9am, HST 478

Title:      Improving the interoperability of pathway knowledgebases for knowledge-base-driven biological pathway analysis
Abstract: Pathway enrichment analysis is a powerful tool for elucidating the genetic mechanisms of complex disease phenotypes. Many pathway knowledgebases, such as Reactome, BioCyc, WikiPathways, or KEGG, have been created to assist in the performance of enrichment analysis. There is no standardized procedure for selecting pathway resources for enrichment analysis, and using different databases as sources of pathways can cause substantial variation in analysis results. In light of this, some tools and resources have tried to leverage the content of multiple pathway data sources, but pathways from various databases can be difficult to integrate due to differences in content and in choices of knowledge representation. Naively combined pathway data can contain redundancies that negatively affect analysis results.

 

To improve the outcomes of enrichment analysis, we need better ways of integrating pathway resource data. We propose to systematically describe the representational differences between resources, and to create a system that intelligently identifies and resolves inconsistencies between pathway representations. We will then generate combined pathway representations and evaluate their performance in pathway enrichment analysis relative to established analysis tools.

February 20-24 Weekly News

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS 

BIME Faculty Candidate – Marzyeh Ghassemi, PhD Candidate

Monday, February 27, 10:00 a.m., South Lake Union, Orin Smith Auditorium (livestream available via tcs.slu.washington.edu; video will be labeled as “BIME Faculty Candidate” with a red dot in the top left hand corner)

 Speaker: Marzyeh Ghassemi, PhD Candidate

MIT Computer Science Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Title:  Representation learning for health with multi-modal clinical data

Abstract:  The explosion of clinical data provides an exciting new opportunity to use machine learning to discover new and impactful clinical information. Among the questions that can be addressed are establishing the value of treatments and interventions in heterogeneous patient populations, creating risk stratification for clinical endpoints, and investigating the benefit of specific practices or behaviors. However, there are many challenges to overcome. First, clinical data are noisy, sparse, and irregularly sampled. Second, many clinical endpoints (e.g., the time of disease onset) are ambiguous, resulting in ill-defined prediction targets.
In this talk, I will discuss the need for practical, evidence-based medicine, and the challenges of creating multi-modal representations for prediction targets varying both spatially and temporally. I will present recent work that addresses the learning good representations across clinical applications that deal with missing and noisy data. I will discuss work using the electronic medical records for over 30,000 intensive care patients from the MIMIC-III dataset to predict both mortality and clinical interventions, as well as work from a non-clinical setting that uses non-invasive wearable data to detect harmful voice patterns, and the presence of pathological physiology. To our knowledge, classification results on these task are better than those of previous work. Moreover, the learned representations hold intuitive meaning – as topics inferred from narrative notes, and as latent autoregressive states over vital signs. The learned representations capture higher-level structure and dependencies between multi-modal time series data and multiple time-varying targets.

Medicine Grand Rounds, Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, Free From Harm: Accelerating Patient Safety to Improve Population Health

WHEN Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, 8 – 9 a.m.
DESCRIPTION President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Patient Safety Foundation, the NPSF Lucian Leape Institute, and the Certification Board for Professionals in Patient Safety, Dr. Gandhi is a prominent advocate for patient safety at the regional, national and international level, driving educational and professional certification efforts, and helping to create and spread innovative new safety ideas. Dr. Gandhi was previously Chief Quality and Safety Officer at Partners Healthcare, in Boston MA, leading the standardization and implementation of patient safety best practices, and throughout her career, Dr. Gandhi has been committed to educating other clinicians on the topic of patient safety. Her research interests focus on patient safety and reducing error using information systems. She was included in Modern Healthcare’s 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare 2014-2015; Top 25 Women in Healthcare 2015; and 50 Most Influential Physician Executives and Leaders 2016.
Location Magnuson Health Sciences Center A (HSA)
CAMPUS ROOM Hogness Auditorium, A420
EVENT TYPES Lectures/Seminars, Special Events
EVENT SPONSORS UW Medicine Patient Safety and Quality Executive Committee, co-sponsored by Department of Medicine and UW Medicine Chief Medical Officer

 

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, February 23, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Room C123A&B

 (Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

 Title: Building health care data products in the era of inflated expectations

 

 Speaker:  Craig Monsen, MD

Clinical Informatics Fellow, Department of Biomedical Informatics & Medical Education, University of Washington

Abstract:  

There is no shortage of buzzwords surrounding health care data today: big data, deep learning, NLP, artificial intelligence and so on. Indeed, the digitization of previously paper records have unlocked a host of applications for data science in health care. However, aside from electronic medical record software, few data-driven tools have seen widespread adoption in clinical practice. By way of sharing a few extracurricular experiences building health care data products, Craig Monsen will explore some of the promise and pitfalls of translating data science methods into sustainable data products in these frothy times.

Speaker’s Bio: 

Craig Monsen is a board-certified internist and first year clinical informatics fellow at University of Washington. His current work includes developing and operationalizing patient risk stratification tools for use in value-based care and building clinician workflow-optimizing products that help clinicians manage the deluge of data they face today. Prior to fellowship, he studied engineering and computer science at Harvard and completed his MD at Johns Hopkins. During medical school he co-founded Symcat, a venture-backed, award-winning company that builds software leveraging data-driven algorithms and mobile technologies to improve triage of patients with undifferentiated symptoms. He writes and has been an invited speaker on topics of consumer engagement and big data and continues to cultivate his interest in using technology to support the triple aim in healthcare.

See the course website for details.

 

BIME 591B–Adventures in R- A Practical Coding Seminar

Tuesday, February 21, 1:00pm-1:50pm, HST T663

Facilitator: Carolyn Paisie, PhD

See course website for details.

 BIME 591D–Biological Pathway Analysis: Trends and Applications

Wednesday, February 22, 11:00-11:50am, SOCC 350

Facilitators: Lucy Wang and John Gennari, PhD

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

February 2017 Fitness Challenge!

Message from Jimmy Phuong, BHI Social Co-Chair:

Feb2017 Fitness Challenge: 1000 Side-crunches

This is a challenge for the month of February issued to all students, alumni, and postdocs. Steadfast 10-day or 20-day plan, use of a rubber ball (or other accommodations), and excessive overachieving are all acceptable so long as it is performed safely. Rewards: amazing core, friendly trash-talking rights, justified libation, and/or the start to achieving more personal goals. This amazing spreadsheet will be the amazing ladder.

There is also a 100-mile running challenge before the end of the month. Ron, Kevin and I are striving for both of those February goals. Join us in one or both if you’re game. This amazing spreadsheet will be the amazing ladder.  I look forward to reporting on the weekly progress.

UPCOMING GENERAL EXAM

Lucy Lu Wang
Monday, February 27, 9am, HST 478

Title:      Improving the interoperability of pathway knowledgebases for knowledge-base-driven biological pathway analysis
Abstract: Pathway enrichment analysis is a powerful tool for elucidating the genetic mechanisms of complex disease phenotypes. Many pathway knowledgebases, such as Reactome, BioCyc, WikiPathways, or KEGG, have been created to assist in the performance of enrichment analysis. There is no standardized procedure for selecting pathway resources for enrichment analysis, and using different databases as sources of pathways can cause substantial variation in analysis results. In light of this, some tools and resources have tried to leverage the content of multiple pathway data sources, but pathways from various databases can be difficult to integrate due to differences in content and in choices of knowledge representation. Naively combined pathway data can contain redundancies that negatively affect analysis results.

To improve the outcomes of enrichment analysis, we need better ways of integrating pathway resource data. We propose to systematically describe the representational differences between resources, and to create a system that intelligently identifies and resolves inconsistencies between pathway representations. We will then generate combined pathway representations and evaluate their performance in pathway enrichment analysis relative to established analysis tools.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Blaine Reeder is a 2010 graduate of the Biomedical and Health Informatics PhD program at the University of Washington School of Medicine. His research focuses on human-centered design of informatics interventions to appropriately support health-related activities, regardless of stakeholder role, goal, or context. A broad objective of Dr. Reeder’s program of research is to understand individual health trajectories across settings by connecting home, health system, and community contexts using sensor-based measures of health (e.g.: smart home and wearable technologies), clinical documentation (e.g.: nurse-sensitive patient data from EHRs), and other data sources and tools (e.g.: neighborhood data and GIS). Following a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington School of Nursing, he accepted a faculty appointment at the University of Colorado College of Nursing on the Anschutz Medical Campus in 2013.

Dr. Reeder has executed his research agenda through a progression of competitively-awarded sponsored projects that build toward an integrated view of health information. He recently completed an Academy Health/AHRQ-funded pilot implementation of an open-source federated data system to compare nurse-sensitive patient outcomes from EHRs in multiple hospitals. The CUPID system (Common Unified Patient Indicator Data) relies on a “precision nursing” approach to inform tailored nursing interventions for patients in acute care settings. Dr. Reeder currently has multi-year research proposals under review at NIH and NSF that propose to scale CUPID: 1) as a discovery tool to understand and eliminate hospitable-based health care disparities (NIH); and 2) as a smart services system that generates patient neighborhood profiles using GIS tools and publicly available data to inform hospital discharge planning (NSF).

Dr. Reeder is user-centered design consultant for several sponsored projects to develop clinical decision support tools in acute- and long term care settings. One of these is the “Identifying, Assessing and Balancing Competing Risks of Multiple Hospital Acquired Conditions (HACs)” AHRQ contract (PI: Heidi Wald) to create a risk model for multiple competing conditions from EHR data sourced from multiple health care systems and visualize this model in a clinical decision-making dashboard. Another is “Improving Antibiotic Stewardship in Long Term Care through UTIDecide Electronic Clinical Decision Support” CDC contract (PI: Heidi Wald) to develop mobile clinical decision support apps that implement evidence-based guidelines at the point of care.

With Co-PIs from the University of Washington (George Demiris), Indiana University (Kay Connelly, Katie Siek, Clemson (Kelly Caine), and the University of Virginia (Kamin Whitehouse), Dr. Reeder was Co-PI for a 2014 planning grant that led to a recent NSF award to develop shared smart home research infrastructure (“CI-New: Collaborative Research: HomeSHARE – Home-based Smart Health Applications across Research Environments”).

Since 2010, Dr. Reeder has published 26 refereed journal articles and 6 full conference papers, and presented his findings nationally and internationally to researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. He owes his academic success to the foundation laid by his training experiences at the UW BHI PhD program.

February 13-17 Weekly News

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME Faculty Candidate – Dr. Haruka Itakura, MD, PhD

Monday, February 13, 10:00 a.m., South Lake Union, C-123A (livestream available via tcs.slu.washington.edu; video will be labeled as “BIME Faculty Candidate” with a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Speaker: Dr. Haruka Itakura, MD, PhD

Instructor in Oncology at Stanford University

Title:  Multi-scale Data Integration Frameworks to Improve Cancer Outcomes

Abstract:  Cancer research demands effective strategies to exploit the vast amount of unharnessed information in multi-scale data for the extraction of clinically actionable knowledge. Without such strategies, the expectation of cancer big data leading to significant discoveries and improvements in clinical outcomes would remain unrealized. Because multi-scale cancer data (imaging, omics, histopathologic, and clinical) are high-dimensional, heterogeneous, and exhibit complex inter-data interactions, knowledge extraction requires innovative methods of integrative analysis. Creative applications of effective informatics methods based on modern statistical and machine learning principles can extract clinically useful knowledge from cancer big data. In this talk, I will describe two specific methodologic approaches that I have developed to enhance knowledge extraction through integrative analyses that: (1) relates imaging data to molecular data, and (2) provides biomedical decision support (prediction of clinical outcomes) from multi-scale data.

Medicine Grand Rounds, Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, Free From Harm: Accelerating Patient Safety to Improve Population Health

WHEN Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, 8 – 9 a.m.
DESCRIPTION President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Patient Safety Foundation, the NPSF Lucian Leape Institute, and the Certification Board for Professionals in Patient Safety, Dr. Gandhi is a prominent advocate for patient safety at the regional, national and international level, driving educational and professional certification efforts, and helping to create and spread innovative new safety ideas. Dr. Gandhi was previously Chief Quality and Safety Officer at Partners Healthcare, in Boston MA, leading the standardization and implementation of patient safety best practices, and throughout her career, Dr. Gandhi has been committed to educating other clinicians on the topic of patient safety. Her research interests focus on patient safety and reducing error using information systems. She was included in Modern Healthcare’s 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare 2014-2015; Top 25 Women in Healthcare 2015; and 50 Most Influential Physician Executives and Leaders 2016.
Location Magnuson Health Sciences Center A (HSA)
CAMPUS ROOM Hogness Auditorium, A420
EVENT TYPES Lectures/Seminars, Special Events
EVENT SPONSORS UW Medicine Patient Safety and Quality Executive Committee, co-sponsored by Department of Medicine and UW Medicine Chief Medical Officer

 

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, February 16, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Bldg E, Room E130A&B

*Please note change of location for this week’s seminar*

(Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title: Reviewing Informatics Year-in-Reviews

Speakers:

Michael Leu, MD, MS, MHS

Associate Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education

University of Washington

Adam Wilcox, PhD

Professor and Chief Analytics Officer, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington

Abstract:  Recently, leaders in many informatics professional organizations have presented or published summaries of important publications or events over a recent year. While these reviews are not systematic reviews of the effects of the field, they are useful for identifying trends and changes in the field. This presentation will discuss various annual reviews in the field, and then summarize recent reviews and events. The goal of the presentation is to briefly convey the review content from multiple sources to familiarize attendees with both the review process and recent history in the field

Speakers’ Bios:

 Dr. Leu is a board-certified pediatrician and clinical informatician.  He is the Program Director of the University of Washington Clinical Informatics Fellowship, and a member of the Association of Medical Directors of Information Systems (AMDIS).  His research interests include 1) How use information technology to disseminate best practice for clinician use, 2) value analysis of clinical recommendations, and 3) using informatics as the foundation for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety efforts.

Adam Wilcox, PhD, is a Professor for the Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education at the University of Washington. He also serves as the Chief Analytics Officer for UW Medicine. He has broad experience in both applied and research informatics. Dr. Wilcox completed a double major in 1995 in Physics and Mathematics at the University of Utah. He then obtained his PhD in 2000 in Medical Informatics at Columbia University (Advisor George Hripcsak). Dr. Wilcox worked with the informatics group at Intermountain Healthcare under Paul Clayton from 2001-2006, where he led the development and implementation of primary care and emergency medicine systems, while also researching the effectiveness of care managers in an advanced practice model that was a precursor to the patient-centered medical home. While at Intermountain, he was also faculty at the University of Utah, where he taught courses and lectures in research design and decision support. He was then faculty at Columbia University from 2006-2013, where he directed the legacy clinical information system, clinical data repository and data warehouse, and was also principal investigator of the Washington Heights/Inwood Informatics Infrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research (WICER) project, one of the country’s first population health research databases, funded by AHRQ. He arrives most recently from Intermountain Healthcare where he led Intermountain’s clinical decision support efforts and directed its analytic health repository. In 2015, Dr. Wilcox was appointed a member of the PCORI Methodology Committee. He is an elected fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, is a senior editor for eGEMs, and serves on the Clinical Informatics Subcommittee for the American Board of Preventive Medicine, which administers the board examination for the clinical informatics subspecialty. He has authored over 100 book chapters, peer-reviewed articles and abstracts, and has presented at conferences and institutions across the country.

See the course website for details.

 

BIME 591B–Adventures in R- A Practical Coding Seminar

Tuesday, February 14, 1:00pm-1:50pm, HST T663

Facilitator: Carolyn Paisie, PhD

See course website for details.

BIME 591D–Biological Pathway Analysis: Trends and Applications

Wednesday, February 15, 11:00-11:50am, SOCC 350

Facilitators: Lucy Wang and John Gennari, PhD

See course website for details.

FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

 “Love Your Data Week

Drs. Tania Bardyn, BIME Affiliate Faculty and Ann Madhavan, your friendly NN/LM-PNR data librarians, want to let you know that next week is “Love Your Data Week” (the same week as Valentine’s day, for obvious reasons).

It takes place on social media and aims to be “a 5-day international event to help researchers take better care of their data”.  We’ll be posting on the PNR’s Facebook, Twitter, Dragonfly blog pages about data issues and trends you may want to know about, whether or not you work directly with researchers or data. By day, here are the topics:

Monday: Defining Data Quality

Tuesday: Documenting, Describing, Defining

Wednesday: Good Data Examples

Thursday: Finding the Right Data

Friday: Rescuing Unloved Data

Feel free to check in with us online whenever you can, and if you feel moved, share your own examples and experiences related to data!  (If you use Twitter, our handle is @nnlmpnr and the event hashtags are #LYD17 #loveyourdata)

February 2017 Fitness Challenge!

Message from Jimmy Phuong, BHI Social Co-Chair:

Feb2017 Fitness Challenge: 1000 Side-crunches

This is a challenge for the month of February issued to all students, alumni, and postdocs. Steadfast 10-day or 20-day plan, use of a rubber ball (or other accommodations), and excessive overachieving are all acceptable so long as it is performed safely. Rewards: amazing core, friendly trash-talking rights, justified libation, and/or the start to achieving more personal goals. This amazing spreadsheet will be the amazing ladder.

There is also a 100-mile running challenge before the end of the month. Ron, Kevin and I are striving for both of those February goals. Join us in one or both if you’re game. This amazing spreadsheet will be the amazing ladder.  I look forward to reporting on the weekly progress.

OTHER EVENTS

 BIME Happy Hour
Thursday, February 16, 5:00 p.m., South Lake Union, Reception Lounge

Please join us for our monthly departmental BYOB Happy Hour, held every third Thursday of the month. As always, please bring your own beverage; snacks will be provided!

February 6-10 Weekly News

UPCOMING LECTURES AND SEMINARS

BIME Faculty Candidate – Dr. Jonathan Chen, MD, PhD

 

UPDATED: Tuesday, February 7, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., South Lake Union, Brotman Auditorium, Brotman Building

(livestream available via tcs.slu.washington.edu; video will be labeled as “BIME Faculty Candidate” with a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Speaker: Dr. Jonathan Chen, MD, PhD

Instructor in the Stanford Department of Medicine

Title:  Wisdom of the Crowd or Tyranny of the Mob?

Data-Mining Health Records for Clinical Decision Support

Abstract:  Medical decision making is fraught with both uncertainty and undesirable variability. The vast majority of our clinical decisions lack adequate evidence to determine their efficacy and inconsistent implementation compromises quality and efficiency.  The current standards in clinical decision support reinforce best-practices but are limited in scalability by manual production. “Grand challenges” thus include mining clinical data sources to automatically generate decision support content.  Statistical approaches allow us to learn patterns that reflect real-world standards of care vs. outliers. This can range from my evaluation of the national distribution of opioid prescriptions to my current NIH Big Data 2 Knowledge K01 Career Development Award directed to empower individual clinicians with the collective experience of the many.

I will review my efforts developing a collaborative filtering machine-learning approach to clinical order entry, analogous to Netflix or Amazon.com’s “Customers who bought A also bought B” algorithm. This automatically generated decision support content can reproduce, and even optimize, manual constructs like order sets while remaining largely concordant with guidelines and avoiding inappropriate recommendations. This has even more important implications for prevalent cases where well-defined guidelines do not exist. The same methodology is predictive of clinical outcomes comparable to state-of-the-art risk prediction models. Embedded randomization of such decision support interventions could then allow us to explicitly build knowledge for the future, even as we enhance care today, in a closed-loop learning health system.

BIME Faculty Candidate – Dr. Haruka Itakura, MD, PhD

Monday, February 13, 10:00 a.m., South Lake Union, C-123A (livestream available via tcs.slu.washington.edu; video will be labeled as “BIME Faculty Candidate” with a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Speaker: Dr. Haruka Itakura, MD, PhD

Instructor in Oncology at Stanford University

Title:  Multi-scale Data Integration Frameworks to Improve Cancer Outcomes

Abstract:  Cancer research demands effective strategies to exploit the vast amount of unharnessed information in multi-scale data for the extraction of clinically actionable knowledge. Without such strategies, the expectation of cancer big data leading to significant discoveries and improvements in clinical outcomes would remain unrealized. Because multi-scale cancer data (imaging, omics, histopathologic, and clinical) are high-dimensional, heterogeneous, and exhibit complex inter-data interactions, knowledge extraction requires innovative methods of integrative analysis. Creative applications of effective informatics methods based on modern statistical and machine learning principles can extract clinically useful knowledge from cancer big data. In this talk, I will describe two specific methodologic approaches that I have developed to enhance knowledge extraction through integrative analyses that: (1) relates imaging data to molecular data, and (2) provides biomedical decision support (prediction of clinical outcomes) from multi-scale data.

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series

Thursday, February 9, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Bldg E, Room E130A&B

*Please note change of location for this week’s seminar*

(Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title: Using Design Thinking to Improve Patient Safety

Speaker: Wanda Pratt, PhD, FACMI

Professor, Information School

Adjunct Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education

Fellow, American College of Medical Informatics

University of Washington

Abstract:  Recent studies indicate that medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States. Although this problem has received substantial national attention, very little work has actively involved patients in preventing, detecting, and recovering from these errors. In this presentation, I will detail our efforts to use design thinking to support patients and their caregivers in playing an active role to safeguard their own health in the hospital. Currently, patients receive inadequate information and support to play such a safeguarding role. Using mixed methods approaches, we have assessed the information needs of hospitalized patients, and created new technology designs and insights for how to address those needs. These insights will support the health-care community in engaging patients as safeguards against medical errors and provide a vision for enhancing the overall patient experience using information technology.

Speaker’s Bio: Dr. Wanda Pratt is a Professor in the Information School with an adjunct appointment in Biomedical & Health Informatics in the Medical School at the University of Washington. She received her Ph.D. in Medical Informatics from Stanford University, her M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Texas, and her B.S. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Kansas. Her research focuses on understanding patients’ needs and designing new technologies to address those needs. She has worked with people coping with a variety of chronic diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Dr. Pratt has received best paper awards from the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA), the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, and the Journal of the American Society of Information Science & Technology (JASIS&T). Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Library of Medicine, the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation, Intel, and Microsoft. Dr. Pratt is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics. In addition, she is on the Board of Directors for AMIA, and Chaired their 2016 Annual Symposium.

 

BIME 591B–Adventures in R- A Practical Coding Seminar

Tuesday, February 7, 1:00pm-1:50pm, HST T663

Facilitator: Carolyn Paisie, PhD

See course website for details.

BIME 591D–Biological Pathway Analysis: Trends and Applications

Wednesday, February 8, 11:00-11:50am, SOCC 350

Facilitators: Lucy Wang and John Gennari, PhD

See course website for details.

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January 30-February 3 Weekly News

BIME 590A – Biomedical & Health Informatics Lecture Series
Thursday, February 2, 4:00pm-5:00pm, UW Medicine South Lake Union, Bldg C, Room C123A&B

(Also broadcast live and archived at tcs.slu.washington.edu; livestream will have a red dot in the top left hand corner)

Title: Matching value to need for vulnerable populations through informatics and care redesign

Speaker: David A. Dorr, MD, MS

Associate Professor and Vice Chair, Clinical Informatics

Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology

School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract:  Vulnerable populations, such as frail older adults, people with complex or multiple illnesses, or those with biopsychosocial risk factors, are more likely to need more proactive, coordinated care, but often do not receive it.  Care Management Plus, our model of providing improved data, information, and knowledge coupled with care redesign, has shown improved outcomes for these populations, but tailoring an approach based on need can be challenging.  Recently, the National Academic of Medicine has released a series of guides on how to better stratify and segment patient populations and tailor care and care systems appropriately.  This talk will discuss the current state, successes, and continued challenges of these approaches. A special focus will be on enhancing the social, behavioral, and genomics information as we enhance our ability to improve outcomes for these populations.

Speaker’s Bio: David A. Dorr, MD MS earned his BA in Economics (with minors in Mathematics and Psychology) and his MD from Washington University in St. Louis. He then completed Internal Medicine residency at Oregon Health & Science University, and earned a Master’s in Medical Informatics and Health Services Administration from the University of Utah.

Broadly, David’s interests lie in complex care management, especially for older adults and other at-risk populations, coordination of care, collaborative care, chronic disease management, quality, and the requirements of clinical information systems to support these areas.  From these interests, he has broadened into clinical information needs, Electronic Health Record (EHR) deployment and Health Information Exchange as a way to expand systems-based approaches to all of health care. Finally, David performs evaluations of care management and informatics initiatives using a variety of methodologies.

His current projects include dissemination, further innovation, and evaluation of the Care Management Plus project (funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation).  He developed the Integrated Care Coordination Information System (ICCIS), a population management system connected to multiple EHRs and other data sources that does risk stratification, complex care management, quality measurement, and reporting.  He works on primary care redesign modeling, using pragmatic/effectiveness trial designs to study how changes in incentives, technology infrastructure, and practice facilitation can help improve health, reduce cost, and improve patient satisfaction with care; his current study is the TOPMED trial (www.topmedtrial.org, funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation ) and he provides technical assistance for the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative (http://innovation.cms.gov/initiatives/Comprehensive-Primary-Care-Initiative/) and informatics initiatives.

 
 

BIME 591B–Adventures in R- A Practical Coding Seminar

Tuesday, January 31, 1:00pm-1:50pm, HST T663

Facilitator: Carolyn Paisie, PhD

See course website for details.

BIME 591D–Biological Pathway Analysis: Trends and Applications

Wednesday, February 1, 11:00-11:50am, SOCC 350

Facilitators: Lucy Wang and John Gennari, PhD

See course website for details.

 
FACULTY/STUDENT/ALUMNI/STAFF ACTIVITIES

Professor Wanda Pratt has been invited to be on a strategic planning panel for the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to address the future as it relates to the “Role of NLM in Supporting the Public’s Health: Clinical Systems, Public Health Systems and Services, and Personal Health.”

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Professor Wanda Pratt will be giving an invited talk “Using Design Thinking to Improve Patient Safety” at Harvard’s Center for Research on Computation and Society on Monday, January 30th.

We have two papers in the upcoming Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) conference in Portland in February, and the paper led by Jordan Eschler has received a Best Paper Honorable Mention award:

1. Jordan Eschler, Wanda Pratt “’I’m so glad I met you’: Designing dynamic collaborative support for young adult cancer survivors”. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (Best Paper Honorable Mention)

2. Katie O’Leary, Arpita Bhattacharya, Sean A. Munson, Jacob O. Wobbrock, Wanda Pratt “Design Opportunities for Mental Health Peer Support Technologies” Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing