David Crosslin, PhD


Interests:

The Electronic Medical Records & Genomics (eMERGE) Network is on the forefront of precision medicine and discovery using mined phenotypes, and has transitioned from discovery, to interpretation and integration into the EHR for CDS,

Research:

Dr. Crosslin’s academic and professional research experience have been focused on statistical genetics and bioinformatics with applications to complex diseases.  His doctorate research in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics at Duke University focused on the central theme of modeling metabolic pathways through dimension reduction techniques of genomics data to understand the etiology of complex traits such as cardiovascular disease.  Dr. Crosslin’s postdoctoral training at the University of Washington (UW) focused on the areas of clinical applications of genetics, statistical genetics, and sequencing technologies.  This led to an Acting Instructor faculty position in Genome Sciences at UW.  Along with the BIME faculty appointment, Dr. Crosslin has an affiliate faculty appointment at Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, and an adjunct faculty appointment in Genome Sciences.  Dr. Crosslin’s research program focuses on translational bioinformatics with a combination of bioinformatics, statistical association analyses, and computational tools development for applied research.  Specifically, his research focuses on integrating genetic data into the electronic health record (EHR) for clinical decision support (CDS).  All efforts will advance the national electronic health information infrastructure in support of personalized medicine.  Dr. Crosslin has been and will continue to be affiliated with one such NHGRI effort.  The Electronic Medical Records & Genomics (eMERGE) Network is on the forefront of precision medicine and discovery using mined phenotypes, and has transitioned from discovery, to interpretation and integration into the EHR for CDS.  When not spending time with his daughters, Dr. Crosslin enjoys training, camping, kayaking, and college football.

Representative publications:

Crosslin D.R., Shah S.H., Nelson S.C., et al., 2009: “Genetic effects in the leukotriene biosynthesis pathway and association with atherosclerosis,” Human Genetics, 125:217-229. (PMCID: PMC2759090.)

Crosslin D.R., McDavid A., Weston N., et al., 2012: “Genetic variants associated with the white blood cell count in 13,923 subjects in the eMERGE Network,” Human Genetics, 131(4):639-652. (PMCID: PMC3640990.)

Crosslin D.R., Carrell D.S., Burt A., et al., 2014: “Genetic variation in the HLA region is associated with susceptibility to herpes zoster,” Genes & Immunity, 16(1):1-7. (PMCID: PMC4308645.)

Crosslin D.R., Tromp G., Burt A., et al., 2014: “Controlling for population structure and genotyping platform bias in the eMERGE multi-institutional biobank linked to Electronic Health Records” Frontiers in Genetics, 5:352, eCollection. (PMCID: PMC4220165.)

Crosslin D.R., Robertson P.D., Carrell D.S., et al., 2015: “Prospective participant selection and ranking to maximize actionable pharmacogenetic variants and discovery in the eMERGE Network,” Genome Medicine, 7(1):67, eCollection. (PMCID: PMC4517371.)